Misbehaving Expatriate Arab Ladies! Reply

Smoke 1 Smoke 2 Smoke 3 Smoke A

Images – Smoking Ladies! – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

On 25 Aug 2014 22:10,  a good reliable friend (source) sent me this email – about her experiences with some Foreign Arab (Levant) Ladies. Will reproduce verbatim as is self explanatory!

QUOTE –

Dear Majid,

After what had happened to me today I immediately thought of sharing this with you – it might not be the kind of story you want to write in your news forum – please do write it for the sake of omani women.

It all started when I took my kids for swimming in Al Khalili swimming in Al khuwair near the Egyptian school. As usual it was ladies time and the pool was filled with mums and kids – most of the kids were below 5 years of age.  As soon as my girls were changed and in the pool – I took a chair to sit and observe them – then this terrible smell of cigarette started – and in the middle of all kids and other mums were these 4 (shami) ladies smoking. I approached them and politely requested if they want to smoke they should go outside the pool area – they ignored me – so again I explained its not allowed to smoke in such public area where small kids are exposed to smoking – I could not believe their own kids who are like 3 to 5 were just there playing and breathing all the smoke like its nothing.

Ok – back to my story – the lady smoker just looked up at me and gave that look  like nothing happened – I gave her an empty cup and told her in a firm tone – please put that cigarette out. the other shami lady was like its not your business so I lost it and took the cigarette from her mouth and threw down and stepped on it. then they all started attacking me – like smoking was a great thing – I could not believe it they all took cigarettes and I kept repeating its not allowed to smoke there are kids here and they were – this is our rights – so I said what right?? you have no right to smoke between all these small kids – all these other mums do not appreciate what you are doing – they were saying well if you don’t like our smoking then leave the pool!!

Imagine then, she says if we were american you would not have said a thing – so i said if you were american you would have respect for other people – and she said listen – you omani women – you are not like us – we have rights – so I said what rights?? smoking rights? and she answered the moment your rights ends our rights begin. so I said Alhamdullilah I am Omani in Oman so my rights will not end for stupid women like you who fight for smoking like its a wonderful thing. Imagine they had hijabs on and they say – then let Oman ban the swimming costume if they can not allow women to smoke.  so I said we respect that and that is why we have a women day.

I told her off – Lady you may smoke to your death in your home surrounded by your kids but here in public place where there are other women and very small children you should not smoke and don lecture me about rights and i never heard of women rights to smoke maybe in Syria but not in Oman.

and she started swearing on omani women – you omani women you have no thaqafa – thank god we dont have it – if it means we smoke in front of our kids. I have not seen such disrespectful women like shami women – they are rude and just because they do not have values in their country they do not respect other people’s values.

Please majid if you ever get chance put this on your blog.

UNQUOTE!

Reminds me of my book A Cry For Help! and Psychology of Arab Management Thinking! http://www.myownmajid.com

and http://www.myown-ebooks.com

QED!

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Rwanda Genocide – Twenty Years On! Reply

Rwanda Genocide – Twenty Years On!

Twentieth Anniversary today!

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Sayings –

History will always repeat itself because humans never learn from their mistakes

George Bernard Shaw: We learn from history that we learn nothing from history.

George Santayana: Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

George Wilhelm Hegel: What experience and history teach is this — that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles.

Maya Angelou: History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.

Thucydides: History is Philosophy teaching by examples.

Unless we learn from history, we are destined to repeat it. This is no longer merely an academic exercise, but may contain our worlds fate and our destiny – Alex Haley

‘The world is too dangerous to live in – not because of the people who do evil but because of the people who sit and let it happen’. – Albert Einstein

Some Connecting Websites –

 

 

  • The world said – Never Ever Again! When over 6 million Jews were massacred in The Holocaust by Nazi Hitler Thugs!
  • The World Watched without shame – when The Palestinians were depopulated, massacred and their lands taken away with support of The West by the same peoples that were victims of The Holocaust!
  • In 1964 mainly Omanis were massacred in The Bloody Zanzibar Revolution – whilst those supposed to Protect Them  looked the other way! They too lost in the end of it all! They too lost Zanzibar!
  • This was Africa’s First Ethnic Cleansing!
  • 20 years ago – The World said NEVER AGAIN! when the Rwanda massacres took place!
  • And here we are all over again!
  • Myanamar (Burma) – Central African Republic – Syria – and others failing states following like even Egypt etc!
  • How terrible, tragic and said!
  • The human being will never ever learn – that is the terrible reality and tragedy of mankind.
  • The line between humanity and evil is so thin – and you can easily cross it anytime – especially if not looking!
  • The World – DO NOT CRY FOR US!

God Is Great! Allah Kareem!

 

Omanisation must stretch to the very top of industry Reply

Omanisation must stretch to the very top of industry

 

Salim bin Nasser

Salim bin Nasser Al Hadhrami – DG Planning & Development – MOM

Times of Oman – March 31, 2014 – By Elham PourMohammadi

Muscat: Omanis should be in high-level positions in industry and the private sector needs to assist the Ministry of Manpower to achieve this, a senior official told the Times of Oman.

The Ministry of Manpower, along with some other government organisations, is making efforts to reduce the level of expatriates working in the private sector in Oman from its current level of 39 per cent of the total manpower to 33 per cent, said Salim bin Nasser Al Hadhrami, Director General of Planning and Development at the Manpower Ministry.

“Recently, the Ministry of Manpower announced some ministerial decisions to organise the job market with a focus on joint inspections in all governorates,” he said. “We have found cases where an individual owns several business entities where hundreds of expatriates are working but, unfortunately, there is no Omani working in these organisations,” Al Hadhrami said, adding that the ministry has decided not to deal with any organisation where there is no Omani, since March 1.

“Unfortunately, some people explained that Omanis will work in ordinary positions. But we did not mean that. We actually wanted Omanis to work at managerial and technical professions in big companies.”

The director general added that small- and medium-sized companies also have to be managed by Omanis who dedicate themselves to their businesses.

“We know that there is a special authority for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) which provides them all the support,” Al Hadhrami said, referring to the Public Authority for SME Development.

He added that the efforts of the ministry and related organisations are aimed at organising the job market. “We expect all the parties to cooperate with us to correct the situation. We all know that the private sector is a strategic partner. Therefore, we expect them to employ more Omanis.”

He also noted that there has been no announcement so far as to how many expatriates would be replaced with locals throughout the Omanisation process.

At current employment levels, the Times of Oman calculated that reducing the number of private sector expat workers from 39 per cent to 33 per cent would ultimately see approximately 100,000 roles being Omanised over time. That number could fluctuate though as the general employment pool rises as Oman continues to expand and grow. Ministry officials have consistently said there is no deadline to achieve that 33 per cent target.

To get in touch with the reporter: elham@timesofoman.com
Remarks – Fully Agree!
And what I always say the very same things in my books and columns!
Take Care!
Majid Al Suleimany

 

Do Not Give Up! Reply

Famous Failures!

Discouraged? See This!

Famous Failures

The Beatles were told – your music is too loud! It will NEVER take off!

Never Give Up 1 Never Give Up 2 Never Give Up 3 Never Give Up 4 Never Give Up A

Images Do Not Give Up! For Demonstration Purposes Only!

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MAJID AL SULEIMANY BOOKS – http://www.myownmajid.com  

It has not died .. Simply No one can kill it – except The Good Lord Only!

CERTAINLY NOT THE MAFIAS – NOR THE OLD GUARDS! WORKING TOGETHER TO BLOCK THE TRUTH – AND PREFER IT TO BE PUSHED UNDER THE CARPET!

A BLLODY SHAME _ WHERE WE ARE GOING NOW!!

ALLAH KAREEM _ GOD IS GREAT!

Take Care!

Majid Al Suleimany

Muscat – Oman – March 29th 2014.

Be an Indian; But Not In India! The Real Story of The NRIs! Reply

Be an Indian; But Not In India! Real  Story of NRIs!

SAD BUT TRUE! *A MUST READ…*

*From an Indian to an Indian…*

BE AN INDIAN, BUT NOT IN NDIA!

Why do they succeed outside India? Do they do the same to the Locals in other countries??

From Yahoo – East African Circle – By Pradyuman Josh

*Forwarded as received. *

Received from an *NRI businessman’s’  Group* in India

NRI refers to Non-Residents of India

*VERY INTERESTING AND TRUE! *

This is worth your time. Who ever put this together, is no fool and has the right vision about India, makes sense and is an eye opener.

I remember Brits in our own country India before independence that when Indians use to address them ‘YES, SIR!’ and joining their hands and bowing to them, as if they (Indians) were servants and Brits ‘Masters’ in India. *Imagine being a servant in ones’ own country.*

What for? Because of the white skin, privileged masters? They used and abused Indians in their own country and reduced them ‘to being stupid, suppressed them and broke down their self-esteem way down and made themselves (Brits) the masters of the slaves.

No wonder Brit’s ruled the world with that attitude and took/made us fools!

India would have been freed from Britain if our ancestors had fought and revolted against the Brits as did the Americans in the USA in the 16th century. Remember ‘the Boston Tea Party’ and other historical events where people revolted and gained independence from the colonial powers?

*Thought Provoking reasoning:*

I would like to sum up our performance in the 20th century in one sentence. Indians have succeeded in countries ruled by whites, but failed in their own. This outcome would have astonished leaders of our independence movement. They declared Indians were kept down by white rule and could flourish only under self-rule.

This seemed self-evident. The harsh reality today is that Indians are succeeding brilliantly in countries ruled by whites, but failing miserably in India. They are flourishing in the USA, Canada, UK, Europe, far east, etc.

But those that stay in India are pulled down by an outrageous system that fails to reward merit or talent, fails to allow people and businesses to grow, and keeps real power with unfaithful leaders, corrupt politicians, and selfish assorted manipulators. Once Indians go to white-ruled countries, they soar and conquer summits once occupied only by whites.

Rono Dutta has become head of United Airlines, the biggest airline in the world with a Fleet size of 705 aircrafts and 381 destinations world wide. Had he stayed in India, he would have no chance to lead in the Indian Airlines.

Even if the top job there was given to him by some godfather, the corrupt, dominating politicians and trade unionists would have ensured that he could never run it like United Airlines. Vikram Pundit was head of Citigroup until recently, which operates Citibank, one of the largest banks in the world.

Rana Talwar has become head of Standard Chartered Bank, one of the biggest multinational banks in Britain, while still in his 40s. Had he been in India, he would perhaps be a local manager in the State Bank, taking orders from politicians to give loans to politically favored clients.

Lakhsmi Mittal has become the biggest steel baron in the world, with steel plants in the US, Kazakhstan, Germany, Mexico, Trinidad and Indonesia. Indias’ socialist policies reserved the domestic steel industry for the public sector. So Lakhsmi Mittal went to Indonesia to run his family’s first steel plant there. Once freed from the shackles of India, he conquered the world.

Subhash Chandra of Zee TV has become a global media king, one of the few to beat Rupert Murdoch. He could never have risen had he been limited to India, which decreed a TV monopoly for Indian gov’t company, Doordarshan. But technology came to his aid: satellite TV made it possible for him to
target India from Hong Kong. Once he escaped Indian rules and soil, he soared.

You may not have heard of 48-year old Gururaj Deshpande. His communications company, Sycamore, is currently valued by the US stock market at over US $30 billion, making him perhaps one of the richest Indians in the world. Had he remained in India, he would probably be a politician in the Department of  Telecommunications.

Arun Netravali has become president of Bell Labs, one of the biggest research and development centers in the world with 30,000 inventions and several Nobel Prizes to its credit. Had he been in India, he would probably be struggling in the middle cadre of Indian Telephone Industries. Silicon Valley alone contains over 100,000 Indian millionaires.

Indra Krishnamurthy Nooyi has been the CEO of  PepsiCo Inc. since 2006, a Fortune 500 company.

Sabeer Bhatia invented Hotmail and sold it to Microsoft for US $400 million.

Victor Menezes, born in Pune in 1949, was number two in Citibank until late last year.

Shailesh Mehta is CEO of Providian, a top US financial services company.

Also at or near the top are Rakesh Gangwal of US Air, Jamshd Wadia of Arthur Andersen, and
Aman Mehta of Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Corp.

In Washington DC, the Indian CEO High Tech Council has no less than 200 members, all high tech-chiefs. While Indians have soared, India has been stagnated.

At its independence time, India was the most advanced of all colonies, with the best prospects.

Today with a GNP per head of $370, it occupies a lowly 177th position among 209 countries of the world. But poverty is by no means the only or main problem.

India ranks near the bottom in the United Nations’ Human Development Index, but high up in Transparency Internationals’ Corruption Index.

The politician-raj (rule) brought in by socialist policies is only one reason for Indias’ failure. The more sordid reason is the rule-based society we inherited from the British Raj, is in tatters today. Instead
money, muscle and influence matter the most.

At independence we were justly proud of our politicians. Today, we regard them as scoundrels and criminals. They have created a jungle of laws in the holy name of socialism, and used these to line their pockets and create patronage networks. No influential crook suffers. The Indian Mafias flourish unhindered because they have political links.

The sons of police officers, politicians, rich people believe they have a license to rape and kill and get away from being charged criminally or prosecuted. Talent cannot take you far amid such bad governance.

We are reverting to our ancient feudal system where no rules applied to the powerful ones. The British Raj brought in abstract concepts of justice for all, equality before the law. These were maintained in the early years of independence. But, sixty years later, citizens wail that India is a lawless land where no rules are obeyed.

I have heard of an IAS probationer at the Delhi training academy pointing out that in India before the British came, making money and distributing favors to relatives was not considered a perversion of power, it was the very rationale of power. A feudal official had a duty to enrich his family and caste.

Then the British came and imposed a new ethical code on officials. But, he asked, why should we continue to choose British customs over Indian ones now that we are independent?

The lack of transparent rules, properly enforced, is a major reason why talented Indians cannot rise in India. A second reason is the politician-raj, which remains intact despite supposed liberalization. But,
once talented Indians go to rule-based societies in the west, they take off. In those societies all people play by the same rules, all have freedom to innovate without being strangled by regulations.

This, then, is why Indians succeed in countries ruled by Non-Indians, and fail in their own.

*It is the saddest story of the century for Indians and India.

From Yahoo – East African Circle – By Pradyuman Joshi

NRI 5 NRI 4 NRI 3 NRI 1 NR 2 NRI 6 NRI A

Images For Demonstration Purposes Only!

3. Fwd: FW: SAD but TRUE. A MUST READ!!
Posted by: “Pradyuman Joshi” papla1860@gmail.com
Date: Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:57 am ((PDT))

Date: Sat, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:14 AM
Subject: INDIANS & INDIA: SAD but TRUE…

Saudi officials shut down display at book fair Reply

Saudi officials shut down display at book fair

Summary 

At this year’s Riyadh International Book Fair, greatly anticipated by Saudi writers and intellectuals, a display by a new press run by Saudis out of Beirut was ransacked and shut down.

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Author Madawi Al-Rasheed

Posted March 13, 2014

A man shows a book by Saudi writer and poet Al-Rotayyan during the Riyadh Book Fair in Riyadh

A man shows a book by Saudi writer and poet Mohamed al-Rotayyan during the Riyadh Book Fair at the International Exhibition Center in Riyadh, March 9, 2013.  (photo by REUTERS/Faisal Al Nassar)

*** Author: Madawi Al-Rasheed – Al Monitor

Posted March 13, 2014

Saudi Arabia boasts about the annual Riyadh International Book Fair, where Saudis can explore a flourishing book market, meet authors and engage in intellectual discussion. Every year, however, the book fair is transformed from an intellectual market into something more resembling a battle for the hearts and minds of Saudis. The gathering has become an arena in which multiple actors want to assert their presence, control the event and dictate what Saudis should and should not read. During the 2014 book fair, this struggle resulted in visitors on March 7 posting photos online of the destruction inflicted the night before on the booth of the Arab Network for Research and Publishing, a relatively new press based in Beirut.

Many writers and readers look forward to the annual book event, which breaks up the monotony of intellectual life in the kingdom and allows them to enjoy a different kind of consumption. The government promotes the book fair under the auspices of the Ministry of Information, while security agents, accompanied by members of the Committee for Promoting Virtue and Prohibiting Vice, otherwise known as the religious police, search for books to confiscate and destroy. They also look for any signs of mingling between the sexes and flirtatious behavior deemed to undermine public order. 

A group of young Saudi intellectuals, including Judge Abdulaziz al-Qasim and the journalist Nawaf al-Qudaimi, established the Arab Network for Research and Publishing to promote books offering new perspectives on society, religion and politics.

As the press’ director, Qudaimi worked hard to create a significant collection of books written by Saudis and other Arabs, all presenting new interpretations of history and religious tradition with a view toward reconstructing consciousness and promoting an examination of past and current knowledge.

The press also translates books from other languages, primarily academic English books on Saudi Arabia and other countries. Days before the book fair, Qudaimi had begun to promote the press’ 2014 list, tweeting short promotional materials and summaries of the awaited titles. He was granted permission to display the publishing house’s collection in a designated corner at the Riyadh book fair.

The press’ books arrived and were displayed as expected. Qudaimi’s early publicity effort was so successful that a number of Saudis were looking forward to purchasing copies of their favorite volumes. They were disappointed, however, when they arrived to find the ransacking of the press’ display a day after the book fair opened its doors. Books and papers were scattered and thrown from the tables set up for their exhibition. Thus, the press was only able to display its collection for a very short time before being closed down.

Among Saudi liberals speculating about the reasons behind the raid, the majority prefer to blame the religious police, absolving the regime from any wrongdoing. This is an easy way out for them, because they would like to think of the regime as a bastion of enlightenment working against a tide of religious conservatism, bigotry and radicalization.

They have exhausted this myth, however, and instead live under the illusion that King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz is a reformer, working hard to open Saudi Arabia to new ideas and curb the influence of radical groups across the society. They cheered when a recent royal decree promised to punish radical groups and designate them as terrorists. The raid at the book fair affirms the myth’s collapse.

The raid not only proves that reform in Saudi Arabia is in short supply, but confirms that the regime is not serious about fighting terrorism. Freedom of expression is not by any means an unlimited right, but it is a precondition for open debate, including tackling the roots of violence. Without people being able to engage in free debate, read alternative interpretations and expose themselves to new ideas, the regime is fighting a lost cause. In fact, the raid proves that the government does not want to create the intellectual conditions for new ways of thinking and behaving.

The raided publications hardly contain any radical ideas, blasphemy or immoral material. In fact, several volumes deconstruct the roots of Wahhabi teachings, in particular those that would perpetuate repression at the personal and political levels, promote violence and suppress people’s rights. Many authors are critical of old Wahhabi teachings that promote rejection of democracy and civil and political rights.

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A tweet with a picture of the booth before and after (Twitter/ @Alqudaimi)

A common theme runs through many books in which some authors search for ways to free the Islamic tradition from the authority of religious scholars whose interpretations have become sacred, especially in Saudi Arabia. Rather than exporting Wahhabi ideas, these Saudi authors draw on the work of modernist scholars in North Africa and elsewhere to reconstruct Islamic interpretations suitable for modern society. Many volumes offer a serious critique of Islamists in Saudi Arabia, highlighting their shortcomings in preparing people for demanding their rights.

The book fair raid indicates that such a collection of books has been designated a threat to Saudi national security. The regime, however, cannot fight terrorism simply by arresting terrorists and criminalizing radical language that might incite violence. It should allow people to engage in alternative ways of emancipating themselves and freeing their conscience from the oppressive preaching that still dominates the country.

The regime knows very well, however, that this freedom is inevitably bound to sweep away the political repression that sustains, finances and nourishes those whose main objective is to control the hearts and minds of citizens. As a regime founded on a holy marriage with Wahhabism, one of the most rigid Islamic traditions, considered by some as Islam par excellence, it knows all too well that its survival is dependent on Wahhabism remaining a revered corpus of religious thought.

The Saudi regime is keen to prepare Saudis for the afterlife, but the raided books aim to prepare them for this life, hence they were targeted in a way that demonstrates how dangerous this perspective is viewed. Books that praise the pious rulers of the country, congratulate them on their development projects and commend their support of Islamic causes are well-guarded on the book fair’s shelves. Also those publications that teach one how to ablute during water shortages remain abundant, but those that prepare people to pursue their rights as citizens or deconstruct mythologized history are banned.

No historical or political change can be forthcoming without a paradigm shift that dismantles traditional ways of thinking and replaces them with new perspectives. The regime fears this shift and is determined to suppress its slow birth. The Saudi regime is fighting a losing battle in the age of new media, during which books can circulate in electronic form. Its raid only sparked curiosity and increased people’s determination to search for the destroyed publications online.

The iron curtain has already fallen, and Saudi authors are themselves the new archaeologists with sturdy trowels for excavating a fossilized body of religious and political thought. The famous 10th-century Arab poet Abu al-Tayib al-Mutanabi said that the sword is mightier than the pen, but weak and troubled regimes, such as the Saudis’, seem to fear the pen more than the sword

*** Dr. Madawi Al-Rasheed is a columnist for Al-Monitor and a visiting professor at the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has written extensively about the Arabian Peninsula, Arab migration, globalization, religious trans-nationalism and gender. On Twitter: @MadawiDr

Blacklist companies, not just punish corrupt officials – Saleh Al Shaibany 1

Saleh Al Shaibany

Blacklist companies, not just punish corrupt officials –

Sunday Beat – Times of Oman – March 16, 2014

Saleh Al Shaibany

http://www.timesofoman.com/News/Article-31123.aspx

RELATED STORIES 

  Sunday Beat: Oman   needs strict laws to combat corruption

  Sunday Beat: The   corrupt should not escape the consequences

Real justice will not be done until companies whose senior   officials have been convicted on corruption charges are either blacklisted   for a number of years from bidding for the government tenders, or made to pay   heavy fines.

We should follow the regulations the rest of the world   does to make companies accountable for the actions of their employees   representing them.

The excuse that the board of directors cite by saying,   “we knew nothing about it”, does not wash when it is their job to   know about it. It defies logic when hundreds of thousands of rials disappear   in the company’s bank accounts and the chairman says “it escaped my   notice” or simply that “it was hidden from my view” and the   courts believe that statement. A CEO or a managing director will not   authorise the accountant to use the company’s money to bribe a government   official unless he has approval from someone in the board. There is always   that prior arrangement of “you go ahead with it but I will deny it if   you are caught” type of thing which means the bribe had the blessing   from the top.

For justice to go around a full 360 degrees instead of   doing a semi circle, the Oman Tender Board (OTB) must ban the bribing   companies for at least 10 years from any future activities. It is no excuse   that these companies, just because they employ hundreds of Omanis, should get   away with it. If they are allowed to bid again, then they should pay a fine   equivalent to the bid value of the contract in which they were accused of   offering bribe.

Otherwise, it will be morally wrong when one or two   employees, acting under certain instructions, should be made scapegoats for   something bigger than them without any consequences to the company   itself.

The shocking thing is that while the company is being   investigated for bribery charges, it is still in the running to win the next   contract of the project they had bid for prior to the court case. It is like   telling a school boy “don’t climb this tree again but you can climb the   other one at the back but make sure you don’t fall this time.”

Then there is a question of the auditing companies. How   does it escape their expert scrutiny when a large amount of cash was not   accountable for? If a company is listed in the Muscat Securities Market (MSM)   or in the case of a government organisation, surely the auditors must spot   any financial irregularities. If not, where are they looking?

To say that the financials are hidden from their full   scrutiny is again a lame excuse for not doing their job or simply taking for   granted that “all is well” when it is not, as we now find out. For   listed companies, it is the investors’ money that is used to bribe for   contracts where the board of directors are the trustees. It is not business   ethics, as one insider speculated. “Bribery money is the board of   directors’ way of increasing profits for their investors.”

What about the role of the State Financial and   Administrative Audit Institution when it comes to scrutinise the accounts of   the government’s organisations and their employees? We expect such an   institution with wide powers to put under the spotlight any financial   irregularity committed by officials, especially those at the very top, to act   decisively and timely to win the public’s confidence.

If we argue if we should make board of directors of   private companies responsible for their actions, then it makes perfect sense   to make heads of the ministries take responsibility for the spate of   corruption cases in their patches. If their response is that “we were   not aware of it”, then questions should be asked about their competence.   Somebody else should be appointed who will be “aware of it” when it   starts to happen again.

To sum it all up, corrupt companies should not simply   plead ignorance and blame it on their managers to survive to make money   another day. Similarly, heads of ministries cannot shrug their shoulders by   claiming lack of knowledge. It is part of their responsibility and the buck   stops with them. The time for cover-up has long passed. 

You can get in touch with the writer: saleh@timesofoman.com

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REPRODUCED ARTICLE

Omani CEO jailed for 23 years in graft case: Court Reply

OOC boss gets 23 years jail term in graft case

Thursday 27th, February 2014 / 22:47

Written by Oman Observer  in Head stories

Ordered to pay RO 8 million fine; 2 others sentenced – 

By Zakaria Fikry –

MUSCAT — The Court of First Instance in Muscat yesterday sentenced the CEO of Oman Oil Company (OOC) to 23 years in jail, a fine of RO 8 million and ordered him to be sacked from his post permanently in connection with the Sohar Aromatics case.
The second accused in the case — who is a former adviser to the ministry of national economy — was awarded 10 years in jail, a fine of RO 4 million and deportation for a life-long after severing his term.

The third accused — CEO of South Korea’s LGI Corporation — was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment and a fine of RO 4 million as well as deportation for a life-long after serving his jail term. The court also ordered the restoration of $8 million to the public treasury and that the defendants settle the litigation.

Last December the Public Prosecution accused the CEO of Oman Oil Company with abuse of office, accepting bribes from LGI to facilitate a $1.6 billion pact for construction of the a petrochemical aromatics plant at Sohar industrial port for the Korean firm. In return the defendant took $8.4 million in bribe which he deposited in a Swiss bank. The defendant was convicted of exploiting his position for personal interests, bribery and money laundering

The second defendant was convicted of taking bribes and the third — Korean national CEO of LGI Corporation — was found guilty of offering bribe to procure the contract.

*****

Omani CEO jailed for 23 years in graft case: Court

(Reuters) –

A court sentenced the CEO of state-owned Oman Oil Company to a total of 23 years in jail on Thursday for accepting bribes, abuse of office and money laundering, the most severe punishment meted out in a series of corruption trials that began last year.

The judge at the Court of First Instance in Muscat also convicted Adel al-Raisi, a former aide to the minister of the now-dissolved economy ministry, of organizing a bribe made by a senior official at a South Korea-based firm to Oman Oil Company CEO, Ahmad al-Wahaibi, and sentenced him to 10 years in jail.

The court found the vice CEO of the Korean-based LGI, named in court as Myung Jao Yoo, guilty of paying $8 million to a Caribbean-registered company owned by Wahaibi after winning a billion rial petrochemical project in Sohar Port in Oman.

Myung was also jailed for 10 years. LGI was not immediately available for comment on the court’s verdict.

Oman’s Sultan Qaboos has waged an anti-graft campaign to defuse mass protests in several Omani cities in 2011 that were mainly directed against graft and to demand jobs, issues that fuelled uprisings around the Arab world in the same year.

More than 20 civil servants and businessmen have gone on trial in Oman since last year.

Court documents said the latest case dated back to 2011, when Omani authorities were informed by their Swiss counterparts about suspicious transactions involving Wahaibi’s Swiss bank account. The trial began in December last year.

Oman Oil Company is an investment arm of the government of Oman with over 40 investments inside and outside Oman.

Wahaibi admitted in court to receiving money from Myung but pleaded not guilty to the charge of taking bribes, saying he “didn’t know why LGI transferred $8 million” into his company.

Raisi also pleaded not guilty. He said his confessions during questioning were not genuine

and that he only admitted brokering the deal and receiving the money under pressure.

Myung admitted in court that he had received money from Wahaibi but said he did not remember why. “Maybe it was a birthday gift. I don’t remember,” he told the court.

Apart from the prison sentences, Raisi and Myung were each fined 4 million rials. Myung would be deported after serving his sentence, the court ruled.

Oman Oil Company said in a statement it was committed to “enforcing a stringent code of ethics and corporate governance practices across all levels of the organization”.

Its Deputy CEO, Mulham Al Jarf, said he was given the “rights, responsibilities and authorities of the CEO in August 2013 to ensure that the business operations of the company remain uninterrupted,” the statement added.

At the hearings, Wahaibi admitted that after the cash was deposited into the accounts of his company, he had given the two other defendants their shares of the cash.

The court sentenced Wahaibi to 10 years in jail and fined him 4 million rials ($10.39 million) for accepting bribes, 10 years for money laundering and one million rials and three years in prison for abuse of office.

The court also confiscated all the bribe money in his frozen Swiss bank account. Lawyers confirmed Wahaibi’s sentences would run successively.

($1 = 0.3850 Omani rials)

bribe 2 bribery-in-business[1]

Images For Demonstration Purposes Only!

A Passage To Nowhere! Reply

We have heard the Israeli version of how they treat immigrants – now this is the version of how Arabs treat Arabs that are immigrants! Internal Displaced People (Person) IDPs!

Sad and tragic really! Made me weep – not cry!

Undocumented migrants and refugees in Lebanon reflect on the trials of a rootless and helpless existence

This home felt just like a prison!

We felt like we were just like prisoners!

A Passage To NowhereNo PassagePassage B

In the coming storms – simply no one will be spared – simply no one! Because of bad hearts at work – and everyone thinks they are right and correct only always!

A Passage to Nowhere!

Published on Feb 25, 2014

A story of migrants in Lebanon, whose dreams of finding a new life abroad often turn out to be little more than fantasy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_kzxFV8GDI

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/aljazeeraworld/2014/02/passage-nowhere-201422112599271691.html

For years before Syrian refugees began flooding over the border into Lebanon, undocumented migrants from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and Sudan have been making the hazardous journey there. This film hears from the refugees themselves, about why they came to Lebanon in the first place, what their lives are like, and where they hope to eventually be.

For years before Syrian refugees began flooding over the border into Lebanon, undocumented migrants from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and Sudan have been making the hazardous journey there.

Most of them do so in the often vain hope of being relocated by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to Europe, the US or Canada.

To get to Lebanon, they cross borders and rough terrain. But when they get there, they live on the margins of society and often have to stay far longer than expected.

This film hears from the refugees themselves, about why they came to Lebanon in the first place, what their lives are like, and where they hope to eventually be.

Through three main characters – a Sudanese woman, a young Iraqi, and a Syrian man – the film tells the story of their alienation from mainstream society and their prolonged wait to have their cases processed.

For many migrants, the dream of starting a new life abroad often turns out to be nothing more than a fantasy. Sometimes they never leave, and their journey to Lebanon is truly just a ‘passage to nowhere’

Syria overtakes Afghanistan as the country with the highest refugees in the world! Watch Ukraine now!

*****

Ernest Hemingway

“For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them.”

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage! By Saleh Al Shaibany Reply

Saleh Al Shaibany

http://www.timesofoman.com/News/Article-28760.aspx  

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage

Sunday Beat – By Saleh Al Shaibany – Times of Oman – January 26th 2014

Muscat: The depressing reality is that Oman is beginning     to witness its human capital transferring to other countries for the simple     reason that the Sultanate cannot anymore satisfy the higher wages that its     skilled workers demand.

Talented local workers with years of experience are looking for better paid jobs abroad leaving the country in a brain drain zone. The gap they leave behind cannot be filled by graduates. The human flight can do an irreversible damage on a long-term basis if employers continue to pay low wages to its most experienced Omani staff.

And the problem is deeper than that. Oman is also losing its new talents as well for greener pastures.

With the government investing so much money in education and vocational training, the job opportunities need to match the  college and university leaving students’ expectations for wages. For the record, the Ministry of Finance has allocated OMR2.6 billion for education this year, twice the budget allocated for the same sector last year. The huge capital investment will need to translate into better paid jobs if we have to keep young talents right here at home.

Most of the Omanis who are leaving are emigrating to other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and the prime targets are the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. That means that we are losing professionals and skilled workers that the government has paid millions at different levels of training and education. The areas in which we now face the brain drain are in Information Technology (IT), medicine, the financial sector  and academia. In a fledgling economy like Oman, we cannot leave talent gaps and then hope that things will remain alright. Employers must match the wages paid by our neighbours instead of hoping that someone from abroad will fill these positions when Omanis vacate them. For that to happen, attitudes must also change.

Top on the list is trusting local skills. Oman has     become so dependent on importing talent and the mind set is now embedded deep among the employers that only foreign workers can do a better job.     These employers are now being proved pleasantly wrong. While we shun our own skills, the GCC states hold these in high esteem and companies there     start to poach Omani talents. So where does it leave the huge effort of the     government which is spending about OMR4 billion a year on projects, trade     subsidies and education to inject funds in the private sector? Yes, it does     create jobs but now Omanis want to be paid enough to compensate for their talents.

It took 40 years to create a powerhouse of local skills. The ammunition of that powerhouse is better financial packages. Omani managers know that they are worth much more across the border than here.

In the UAE or in Qatar, a senior IT manager with 10 to 15 years of experience gets a monthly package of around OMR7,000. Here, they only get paid about OMR3,500. New doctors get a maximum of OMR700 per month in the Sultanate. They would get paid about OMR2,500 when they land     jobs in those two countries. One would say it is not exactly patriotism to abandon one’s country in its moment of need but better standard of living     is what drives people these days.

The funny thing is that 20 years ago, Oman barely had any experienced and skilled people to work in the high profile jobs in the private sector. It was natural to import these talents from different countries to push the wheel of development forward. It is a different scenario now. We have the right people now but we are beginning to export local talents when it is mostly needed here. The trend is threatening to wipe out any advancement we made in the last two decades in the build up of skilled workforce.  The result, if we don’t watch out, is the loss of senior managers to foreign bidders and that will give the Omanisation process a severe knock.

It goes without saying that to continue to compete on the global basis, Oman must invest on its local workers by paying them much more than the present wage scales if it wants to retain its skills.

END