Corruption in Energy Sector Hard Nut to Crack: Minister Reply

Corruption in Energy Sector hard nut to crack: Minister

Saleh Al Shaibany – Times of Oman – saleh@timesofoman.com

March 4th 2014

Rumhy Restucci

Dr Rumhy and Restucci of PDO

Muscat: Corruption in the energy sector is a hard nut to crack and gave no assurances that it would not happen again in the future, said Minister of Oil and Gas Dr. Mohammed bin Hamad Al Rumhy yesterday.

Answering a question about whether as oil minister he should take responsibility of the corruption in his sector, Rumhy said: “I am taking responsibility but I am not taking the blame for it”

The minister of oil and gas said he was “disappointed~ about the corruption in the oil and gas sector but the measures have been in place to prevent bribery for a number of years.

“I have personally asked the State Auditors since year 2000 to audit the oil and gas sector. But I don’t think we have anything in place to eradicate corruption to a zero level,” he said

“It is happening now and it will happen again in the future. We cannot monitor and regulate human behaviour and follow people around to find what they are doing all the time,” Rumhy told reporters in the annual oil and gas meeting.

A number of people have been sentenced on corruption charges in the last three months after officials of Oman’s premier energy sector including the country’s flagship oil producing company, PDO and its investment arm Oman Oil Company, were convicted of ‘phising’ off millions of Rials into private accounts.

Raoul Restucci, PDO Managing Director, answering a question said “We are shocked and angry but (corruption) represent a small number of employees. I don’t think we should control more but what we need is to learn from it. What is also needed is consequences management to make people more responsible to what they do”

END

See this also – http://majidall.com/as-to-why-i-had-left-my-last-oil-company-loc/

Dated December 26, 2009 – As To Why I Had Left My Last Oil Company (LOC)!

Or Why I Am So Angry A Person!

Quote – Event – 1992This is the guy I had clashed with in the article The Lady In Red. I had this fear and phobia that I was going to be terminated – and I went in with trembling fear and trepidations that I would lose my job now – and was anyway prepared because as far as I know I had not stolen even one Baizas from The Company – and had not overpaid any Staff or Company – though my budget in my last job was over 16 million USA Dollars per year – and I had full control of this budget unquote

Can The Arabs Ever Learn From Ukraine? Reply

The Ukrainian Peace Deal

Can The Arabs Learn From Ukraine? Now also from Venezuela?

To pulling out from the precipice just in time for the sake of the Nation???

Anti-government protesters man barricades in Kiev Ukraine 2 People gather around tents erected by anti-government protesters in Independence Square in Kiev Anti-government protesters man barricades in Kiev

(Reuters) – A breakthrough peace deal for Ukraine halted two days of violence that had turned the center of the capital into a war zone and killed 77 people, bringing sweeping political change that met many demands of the pro-European opposition.

Russian-backed President Viktor Yanukovich agreed to give up powers, hold early elections and form a government of national unity. Parliament voted for changes to the legal code that could see the release of Yanukovich’s jailed rival, opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko.

By nightfall, opposition leaders who signed the deal were addressing peaceful crowds from a stage in Independence Square, which for the previous 48 hours had been an inferno of blazing barricades and protesters were shot dead by police snipers.

Although the flames were out, the crowd was still defiant, holding aloft open coffins of slain demonstrators and making speeches denouncing the opposition leaders for shaking hands with Yanukovich.

More here or Search Ukraine Peace Deal

Ukraine Peace Deal

Sad what is now happening in Egypt – used to be the leading Arab Nation now reduced to discord, splits and divisions! So are the Arab Nations – others and even those that went through the Arab Spring Revolutions! Like Libya, Yemen etc!

When we Arabs will ever learn? Until it is too late for everyone?

Like George Bernard Shaw said it – or words to similar effect – Islam is the best religion in the world – but its people are the worst!

Leading Islamic Nations instead of uniting  all us and for the sake of our Islam are fighting proxy wars – and causing more harm, decay, havoc and disasters to others! :(!

Very sad and tragic!

May The Good Lord Protect and Preserve us from his anger and fury! Amin Amen

Take Care!

Majid Al Suleimany

With sincere due apologies …!!

Child Euthanasia! What is the world now coming to? Reply

Child Euthanasia! What is the world now coming to?

Now in our advancement, modernity, being fashionable and in being broad mindedness – we are looking for ‘legal methods and ways’ to kill our terminally sick suffering children! Soon the rest of us will copy and emulate – as in our Hadith – Islamic Teachings – ‘like following that lizard that went into a crevice’!

The sad bitter truth of the world now is people taking over ‘illegally’ and calling themselves legal – and those that were legal being branded as illegal! The Chinese have a saying – If you dig a grave for your enemy, dig two graves – and keep one for yourself! The East Africans also say – Those that dig a well will have to enter into it themselves! All metaphors and sayings that have great sense and meaning!

God Protect and Preserve us all from His Anger – Amin Amen!

 ***

Child Euthanasia – Press Coverage

Google for more details and information!

Belgian politicians have decided that terminally ill children suffering immense pain have the right to die. 

It’s all over but the final voting in Belgium as the Parliament agrees across party lines that doctors should be able to euthanize children.

In the wake of several months of testimony from doctors and experts in medical ethics, a Belgian Senate committee will on June 12 examine the possible extension of the country’s euthanasia law to include children. 

“On both sides of the linguistic border, liberals and socialists appear to agree on the fact that age should not be regarded as a decisive criteria in the event of a request for euthanasia, ”De Morgen. They want doctors to decide on a minor’s capacity for discernment on a case by case basis.

Treating a child like a sick horse is what passes for “compassion” these days

The Belgian Federal Parliament is reportedly about to expand its controversial “right to die” policies to include access to euthanasia for some gravely ill children.

A consensus among members of the legislative body has reportedly formed in support of legislation to allow children to choose to undergo euthanasia in certain dire cases, according to a report in the Belgian daily newspaper Der Morgen, as translated by the Paris-based news agency

If child euthanasia is legalized in Belgium, the country would become the first in the developed world to have a law on the books allowing the practice, although the Netherlands has since 2005 not prosecuted doctors who perform euthanasia on some minors as long as the doctors act in accordance with a set of medical guidelines dubbed the Groningen Protocol

Belgium became the second country in the world after the Netherlands to legalize euthanasia in 2002, but the statute currently extends only to people 18 or older

Sorry for a morbid depressing article!

Take Care!

By Majid Al Suleimany – Muscat – Oman – February 14th 2014

 

Images below for demonstration purposes only!

Eutanasia A1 SONY DSC Euthanasia 2 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Euthanasia 4 ???????????????????????????????????????? Euthanasia 6 Children sitting inside school bus Euthanisia A

 

My Oman FM Radio Live Interview! Reply

FatherMajid New (2)

Images – My Late Father PBUH – and I !!

Please go here to hear the full audio 60 minutes!

http://myownmajid.com/2014/02/08/my-own-fm-radio-interview/

 Go here – you will find the link inside! Double click to save or run the audio (60 minutes). Tell me what you think!

Best Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage! By Saleh Al Shaibany Reply

Saleh Al Shaibany

http://www.timesofoman.com/News/Article-28760.aspx  

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage

Sunday Beat – By Saleh Al Shaibany – Times of Oman – January 26th 2014

Muscat: The depressing reality is that Oman is beginning     to witness its human capital transferring to other countries for the simple     reason that the Sultanate cannot anymore satisfy the higher wages that its     skilled workers demand.

Talented local workers with years of experience are looking for better paid jobs abroad leaving the country in a brain drain zone. The gap they leave behind cannot be filled by graduates. The human flight can do an irreversible damage on a long-term basis if employers continue to pay low wages to its most experienced Omani staff.

And the problem is deeper than that. Oman is also losing its new talents as well for greener pastures.

With the government investing so much money in education and vocational training, the job opportunities need to match the  college and university leaving students’ expectations for wages. For the record, the Ministry of Finance has allocated OMR2.6 billion for education this year, twice the budget allocated for the same sector last year. The huge capital investment will need to translate into better paid jobs if we have to keep young talents right here at home.

Most of the Omanis who are leaving are emigrating to other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and the prime targets are the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. That means that we are losing professionals and skilled workers that the government has paid millions at different levels of training and education. The areas in which we now face the brain drain are in Information Technology (IT), medicine, the financial sector  and academia. In a fledgling economy like Oman, we cannot leave talent gaps and then hope that things will remain alright. Employers must match the wages paid by our neighbours instead of hoping that someone from abroad will fill these positions when Omanis vacate them. For that to happen, attitudes must also change.

Top on the list is trusting local skills. Oman has     become so dependent on importing talent and the mind set is now embedded deep among the employers that only foreign workers can do a better job.     These employers are now being proved pleasantly wrong. While we shun our own skills, the GCC states hold these in high esteem and companies there     start to poach Omani talents. So where does it leave the huge effort of the     government which is spending about OMR4 billion a year on projects, trade     subsidies and education to inject funds in the private sector? Yes, it does     create jobs but now Omanis want to be paid enough to compensate for their talents.

It took 40 years to create a powerhouse of local skills. The ammunition of that powerhouse is better financial packages. Omani managers know that they are worth much more across the border than here.

In the UAE or in Qatar, a senior IT manager with 10 to 15 years of experience gets a monthly package of around OMR7,000. Here, they only get paid about OMR3,500. New doctors get a maximum of OMR700 per month in the Sultanate. They would get paid about OMR2,500 when they land     jobs in those two countries. One would say it is not exactly patriotism to abandon one’s country in its moment of need but better standard of living     is what drives people these days.

The funny thing is that 20 years ago, Oman barely had any experienced and skilled people to work in the high profile jobs in the private sector. It was natural to import these talents from different countries to push the wheel of development forward. It is a different scenario now. We have the right people now but we are beginning to export local talents when it is mostly needed here. The trend is threatening to wipe out any advancement we made in the last two decades in the build up of skilled workforce.  The result, if we don’t watch out, is the loss of senior managers to foreign bidders and that will give the Omanisation process a severe knock.

It goes without saying that to continue to compete on the global basis, Oman must invest on its local workers by paying them much more than the present wage scales if it wants to retain its skills.

END

We are not stupid, Sir! Reply

From A Fan! We are not stupid, Sir!

Please Keep Your Head High, Sir!

D - The SequelC - Short TakesE - Between Us Only!3 - BUO TS 32 - BUO ST 2Wipe My TearsUSA Golden Seal

Yesterday night a group of us good getting together friends were having a meal at this Arabian Restaurant in Ghobrah and the subject starting moved to your columns articles. And your call about more Omanis to be needed represented in the especially English press and media as it is now being controlling and dominated by Indian people mainly and also some British peoples.

You also called for more stronger quality powering Omani Managers in the Press and media. Believe me Sir that people mistake us to be not knowing and not smart people and they can fool and play with us. But if they cannot learn than they will never learn in future. We are not stupid peoples. We aware and knowing too.

So Ustaadh please rest now. You have said it but they ignore you and not listen. You have done your job and duty as few Omanis that really care and feel. You take rest because you are now done and take rest Sir. Look after family only now.

Like you always tell us to take care! Ever admirer and fan to you Sir. We will never forget you till end of us.

Please forgive my English.

Omani (Youth) Fan…

The Arab Management Books by Majid Al Suleimany

A - A Cry For Help! B - Psychology

Sharon’s legacy: Only death is irreversible 1

National Infrastructure Minister Ariel Sharon maps out December 5 his vision of an Israeli security ..

Ariel Sharon maps out his vision of an Israeli security zone stretching deep into the West Bank on land Palestinians see as part of a future state, Dec. 5, 1997. (photo by REUTERS)

Sharon’s legacy: Only death is irreversible

Summary – The late Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s legacy, including the disengagement from Gaza, was designed to hinder an agreement with the Palestinians in the West Bank.

Author: Akiva Eldar Posted January 13, 2014 – Al Monitor

It was in the spring of 1992, a number of months after the Madrid Conference, which began the peace process, and before the elections to the Knesset that ended 15 years of Likud Party rule. Ariel Sharon, then the minister of housing in the Shamir government, invited me to tour the Samaria region. From the heights of one of the hills near the Alfei Menashe settlement, he pointed to innumerable, randomly scattered clusters of red roofs, and many gleaming asphalt roads crisscrossing the landscape.

AuthorAkiva EldarPosted January 13, 2014

Translator(s) Aviva Arad

“You’re probably asking yourself, what’s the point of scattering small settlements on every hilltop, instead of concentrating all of them in one settlement?” Sharon thundered in his unique voice and explained, “This dispersion is intended to prevent any government established in Israel from returning to the borders of the Green Line and enabling the creation of a Palestinian state.”

Twenty-two years later, cabinet members who passed before Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s coffin, knew that not too long from now they will have to choose between the creation of a Palestinian state, with a western border based on the Green Line, and a diplomatic-security crisis and the risk of an economic boycott. The motto “Another goat and another dunam” that Sharon inherited from the leaders of the mother party of Israel’s Labor Party, Mapai, who founded the state, has ended its role. The 1977 plan, “A million Jews in Judea and Samaria,” which was meant to thwart the plan to divide the land, has passed from the world.

Despite the generous aid that Sharon and his heirs have offered, and still offer, the settlers, less than 400,000 Jews, 5% of Israel’s population, have chosen to settle in the West Bank. Two-thirds of them are crowded in areas abutting the Green Line. The vast dispersion of isolated settlements all over the West Bank has not swayed the international community to abandon its insistence on the 1967 borders and on territorial exchange as a key to a diplomatic agreement. There is no phenomenon that causes more damage to Israel’s status in the world like the settlement enterprise.

As defense minister in Begin’s government (1981-83), Sharon’s goal was to destroy once and for all the idea of dividing the land and perpetuate the vision of Greater Israel. On this issue, too, he achieved the opposite of his intentions. The pursuit of the leadership of the PLO, and Palestinian Authoriy Chairman Yasser Arafat specifically, into Beirut, in the Lebanon War (1982), which was meant to create a “new order” in Lebanon and push out the PLO, embroiled the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) in a bloody war and strengthened the Shiite, pro-Iranian forces in Lebanon.

More so, the loss of control in Lebanon was the main incentive for Arafat and his exiled friends in Tunisia to recognize Israel within the 1967 borders in 1988, on the basis of UN Resolution 242. From there, the road was already paved for international recognition of the PLO, the convening of the Madrid Conference, the return of the Israeli Labor Party to power, led by the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and to the Oslo Accord.

From his seat in the opposition, Sharon acted as a vocal trumpet for the extreme right, which did not shrink from incitement against Rabin. In an interview with the Kfar Habad ultra-Orthodox journal in 1995, extensively quoted in the daily press, Sharon claimed that Rabin had gone mad. After a short period of calm in the foreign minister’s office in the first Netanyahu government (1996-99), Sharon made his way to the prime minister’s office, upon the ruins of the Oslo process.

His provocative ascent to the Temple Mount in September 2000, at the height of the efforts to revive the failing negotiations at Camp David, gave the signal for the outbreak of the second intifada. The journalist Uri Dan, who was Sharon’s good friend, later recounted, “Arik would call me and ask, do I think there’s a connection between his ascent to the Temple Mount and him becoming prime minister? I answered him in the same way that he asked, ‘And what do you think, Arik, is there a connection?’ There was silence on the other end of the line.”

The series of suicide bombings, whose peak was the murder of 30 Israelis gathered for a Passover traditional meal at the Park Hotel in Netanya, was the grounds for Prime Minister Sharon’s decision, in March 2002, to launch Operation Defensive Shield. While the IDF assault on the cities of the West Bank fatally damaged terrorist elements, it also heavily damaged the physical and political infrastructure of the Palestinian Authority.

Moreover, in his book, A Look at the Resistance from Within, Mohammed Arman, a member of the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades, who is sentenced to 36 life sentences for the murder of more than 40 Israelis, tells how Sharon played into Hamas’ hands. The arch-terrorist revealed that all Hamas units received directions from above to thwart the Arab peace initiative on the eve of its anticipated approval at the Arab League summit in Beirut. The initiative was approved on March 28; the bombing in Netanya took place on March 29. On March 29, Sharon announced Operation Defensive Shield. The din of battle in Jenin and Ramallah drowned out the regional voice of peace from Riyadh to the Maghreb.

A few months before Sharon directed the IDF to surround the Muqata and isolate Arafat from the outside world, the former head of the Mossad, Shabtai Shavit, who was one of Sharon’s advisers, said in an interview with the Israeli daily Yedioth Aharanoth (Dec. 7, 2001) that if Israel could get rid of Arafat, “No one could step into his shoes to open doors among world leaders, and the Palestinian question will fall from the international agenda.” In the same interview Shavit also argued that [Palestinian Authority Chairman] Abu Mazen (Mahmoud Abbas) is “a member of the Bahai faith,” and therefore his appointment as Arafat’s heir “is like appointing a Samaritan as president of the State of Israel.”

Abu Mazen, as we know, was appointed prime minister, a fact that did not prevent Sharon from calling him “a chick who hasn’t sprouted feathers” in a government meeting. When it became clear that despite his efforts to ground Abu Mazen, the two-state solution wasn’t disappearing from the world’s agenda, Sharon formulated the plan for disengagement from the Gaza Strip. The problem was that the disengagement, which was not coordinated with Abu Mazen, led to the Hamas takeover of the Gaza Strip. Nevertheless, the diplomatic process was launched again.

The followers of the “new Sharon,” who claim that the evacuation of the settlements of Gush Katif testifies to Sharon’s reversal in his final political days, are urged to read the interview/confession Sharon’s right-hand man, Dov Weissglass, gave the Israeli daily Haaretz in October 2004.

Here are some enlightening quotations: “The disengagement is actually formaldehyde in which you put the president’s [George W. Bush’s] plan, so that it can be kept for a very long time. It supplied the necessary amount of formaldehyde so that there wouldn’t be a diplomatic process with the Palestinians. … Arik [Ariel Sharon] does not see Gaza as an area of national interest today. He does see Judea and Samaria as a region of national interest. He justifiably thinks that we are still very, very far from the time where we could reach final arrangements in Judea and Samaria.

“What I basically agreed with the Americans was that we don’t deal at all with some of the settlements, and with other settlements we won’t deal until the Palestinians turn into Finns. … Basically, this whole package called the Palestinian state, with all it entails, has been removed from our agenda for an unlimited time. And all this is officially authorized. All this is with a presidential blessing and the approval of the two houses of Congress.

“There was a very difficult package of commitments that they expected Israel to accept. They called this package the diplomatic process. It included components that we could never accept and components that we can’t accept today. But now we have succeeded in taking this package and pushing it past the mountains of time. With the right management, we’ve succeeded in removing the issue of the diplomatic process from the agenda. And we have educated the world that there’s no one to talk to.”

There’s something symbolic, perhaps historical poetic justice, in that the man who dedicated his life to creating an irreversible reality in the occupied territories has passed away just as the diplomatic and political reality at the beginning of 2014 reminds us that only death is irreversible.

Akiva_Eldar_bw[1]

Akiva Eldar is a columnist for Al-Monitor’s Israel Pulse. He was formerly a senior columnist and editorial writer for Haaretz and also served as the Hebrew daily’s US bureau chief and diplomatic correspondent. His most recent book (with Idith Zertal), Lords of the Land, on the Jewish settlements, was on the best-seller list in Israel and has been translated into English, French, German and Arabic

Orphans of the Sahara. 1

Orphans of the Sahara

Documented on Al Jazeera

 Thu, 09 Jan 2014 11:45
Sahara 7Sahara 10Sahara ASahara 8Sahara 9Sahara 13

Orphans of the Sahara is a documentary series about the heartbreaking circumstances of life for the Sahara’s Tuareg people, one of the most isolated and impoverished groups in the world.

May Welsh, award-winning Al Jazeera filmmaker, captures the complex conflict and events in Mali and Niger as they unfold within the Tuareg community.

Due to the presence of al-Qaeda, these desert people have been cut off from aid workers and the rest of the outside world. Welsh’s three films offer viewers rare and exclusive access and insight to the Tuareg separatist struggle in their homeland as well as exploring the rival al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.

Welsh comments, “The Tuareg story is one of an extremely impoverished people whose land harbours the largest energy reserves on the African continent, and who have been fighting for various forms of self-determination for 50 years.”

The first film in the three-part series, Orphans of the Sahara – Return, documents how thousands of Gaddafi’s Tuareg mercenaries return to their Saharan homeland after fleeing from Libya. Terrible poverty, hunger and drought await them in the areas to which they return which are spread across northern Niger and northern Mali.

With few other skills and largely unable to feed their children, the men in Mali rise up to establish their own country while those in Niger risk their lives to return to Libya.

“The story of my son is a man chased by poverty. Hunger that you can see if you look at the women and children around us. He was forced to travel to Libya, so he went. It wasn’t a choice,” says Amamatou Bint Tigzali, mother of a Tuareg fighter.

Orphans of the Sahara – Return, airs on Al Jazeera English on 9 January at 20h00 GMT.

Watch and embed the promo at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4ADnH- 6UbI.

To us the Sahara means our origins. We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It represents our real nation.

Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, lead singer of Tinariwen

The Tuareg of the Sahara   are a people orphaned, literally and figuratively, the filmmaker writes [Al   Jazeera]

The Tuareg of the Sahara desert are a people orphaned, literally   and figuratively, by colonial history and borders, by distant governments, by   poverty, corporate exploitation, pollution, drought, and war.

Their Saharan homeland stretches across five countries and   straddles the largest energy deposits in Africa. And they have risen up   against their governments seven times in the past 50 years to demand forms of   autonomy and independence.

Yet the decades-long Tuareg struggle is one of the world’s least   covered stories.

In Orphans of the Sahara,   Al Jazeera takes the viewer deep inside the Tuareg world.

To us the Sahara means our     origins. We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It     represents our real nation. 

Ibrahim     Ag Alhabib, lead singer of Tinariwen

We will go to their impoverished camps in the desert where life   hangs by a thread, journey inside “Azawad”, the unrecognised Tuareg   state in northern Mali, and into Timbuktu under al-Qaeda control. We will   travel to the French uranium mining zone in northern Niger, an area now out   of bounds to journalists, and into the refugee camps in exile, where Tuaregs   and Arabs are calling for an independent state.

This is a story you won’t see or hear anywhere else. For a   number of years, the Tuareg have been cut off from the world, surrounded by a   vast “red zone” of al-Qaeda kidnappings and killings, preventing   journalists, aid workers and tourists from travelling to the places where the   Tuareg really live.

As a result, they have become increasingly isolated and poorly   understood – seen and interpreted for the outside world through the eyes of   their enemies. They have few friends and no state allies.

Their music has been one of the only genuine insights the   outside world has into their stories and struggles. And for many Tuareg   bands, their songs are a way to relay the message of their people and help   the world understand their plight.

‘A generation of orphans’

“I was young when the army took my father from here,”   he said. “They took him and killed him. And then they killed our   animals. I left with my grandmother for Algeria. And I grew up there. I   always think about that day and this area.”

In exile, Ibrahim met other Tuareg youths with similar stories   and experiences. Together they learned how to fight in Muammar Gaddafi’s   military training camps in Libya. Then, in 1990, they returned in their   thousands to Mali and Niger where they launched rebellions against their   governments to fight for their rights as a people.

We spent hours mesmerised by Ibrahim’s stories and thoughts as   he smoked cigarettes, slowly searching for the right words, often staring out   through the crack of the door into the sand storm whirling around us.

The last thing he said was “my generation of Tuareg is a   generation of orphans”. It was really important to him that we   understand his story was no different to those of thousands of others who   became rebels – that his pain was not unique.

After we returned to Doha, I put Ibrahim’s interview on a shelf   and forgot about it. We are a news channel and I wasn’t sure what to do with   such a long and deep interview on a subject that is obscure to most people   and requires a lot of background and explaining. But he and his words lodged   somewhere deep in my consciousness.

In late 2011, Al Jazeera returned to the region to document the   new exodus of Tuaregs back to northern Mali and Niger following the fall of   Gaddafi in Libya. We noticed a high proportion of orphans, both among the   young returning Tuareg mercenaries, and among the families they were   supporting in the desert.

In 2008, Al Jazeera met Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, the lead singer of   the Tuareg rock band Tinariwen, at his home near Tessalit in northern Mali.

We had just come from spending days in the Sahara with Tuareg   rebels fighting the Mali state and there was a sand storm brewing. We wanted   to stop somewhere and thought it would be interesting to know Ibrahim’s   opinion of the rebellion.

As we took shelter in a small hut from the roaring wind,   Ibrahim shared his powerful personal story — one that will be familiar to all   fans of Tinariwen.

Many of the fighters had lost one or both parents as children,   to undiagnosed illnesses due to malnutrition and lack of medical care. Some   had lost a parent to war. And every one of the men had tried his hand at both   armed rebellion against his government, and emigration to Libya in search of   work – the two options many Tuareg see available to them to improve   conditions for their families and their people.

Many ended up entrapped as mercenaries for Gaddafi during the   recent Libya war. They cried as they talked about the death of their   relatives and friends in NATO bombings, and the immense pressure they feel to   provide for their families – loved ones who they see deteriorating before   their eyes in the harsh conditions of the desert.

One of our subjects died during the course of filming, leaving   behind three orphans. Most of these stories remain on the cutting room floor   because there is barely time, even in three hours, to cover the essential   ground on this complex story.

We realised that Ibrahim Ag Alhabib’s story has not lost its   relevance. New generations of Tuaregs from northern Niger and northern Mali   are simply living a modified version of the same old cyclical story of the   Tuareg people: rebellion, exile, return, rebellion, exile, return …

The reason for the stubborn resilience of this pattern is that   the conditions which give rise to Tuareg rebellion have essentially not   changed.

The Sahara

It is something I found myself wondering more than once during   the nights we spent sleeping in freezing cold deserts, living the same way   our Tuareg hosts do every day. Even the physical stamina required to live in   a tent in the Sahara is incredible and always reminds you of your   vulnerability and mortality. Just a few weeks of the constant exposure to   sand, wind, heat and cold debilitated me to a point of exhaustion it took   months to recover from.

On the other hand, far from being merely harsh and empty, the   Sahara is a soulful place, embracing you with its solitude and beauty, its   open space, and the company of gentle living things. Even the deepest parts   of the desert are not dead, but filled with animals, people, culture, and   history. All the feelings of being there – from sublime comfort and peace to   terror and loneliness – are satisfying in their truth and draw you back to   the desert, in spite of its hardship.

The Sahara enriches and impoverishes the Tuareg. It is their   mother and source, but also their destroyer and grave.

Parts of this trilogy were filmed in the Sahara proper, and   others in cities and deserts of the Sahel, the belt of scrub that lies to the   immediate south of the Sahara. But wherever we found Tuaregs, even if they   were knee deep in yellowing pasture, or standing on a busy city street, they   always referred to their land as “the Sahara”.

“To us the Sahara means our origins,” said Ibrahim.   “We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It   represents our real nation.” Orphans of the Sahara can be seen each     week from January 9, 2014, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000;     Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200;     Wednesday: 0100

The physical conditions of Tuareg existence in the Sahara have   hardly changed in decades. Even now, sleeping in the Sahara is like lying   alone on a boat in the middle of a vast ocean.

You are lying in the sand at 2am when suddenly a primordial wind   howls up from infinite corridors of emptiness and time – terrifying in its   loneliness, as awesome as the stars in the night sky – to confront you with   the essential fact that you are alone in the universe, and everyone you have   ever loved will die.

If the Sahara can inspire that terrible feeling of cosmic   loneliness in an adult, what would it feel like to be a child in this   environment who had actually lost their parents?

Orphans of the Sahara: Return

With the fall of Gaddafi, thousands of Tuaregs return to Mali and Niger and launch their fight for an independent state. ( 09-Jan-2014 )

Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only! Narrations Below

Sahara 12Sahara 11Sahara 6Sahara 5Sahara 4Sahara A

 

The Tuareg are the indigenous people of the Sahara, the world’s largest desert

They are divided by colonial history between Mali and Algeria, Libya, Niger and Burkina Faso

The Tuareg of the Sahara are among the poorest and most isolated people in the world

The Tuareg are the indigenous people of the Sahara desert.

They are one of the poorest and most isolated peoples in the world – and one of the most militarised.

They are an army of the poor in a land of astounding natural wealth; an animal-herding people in a dying world of drought.

For decades, many Tuareg men have left their homes in search of work in neighbouring countries. Thousands ended up in Libya, as workers and fighters, and many as mercenaries for slain Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

In late 2011, after Gaddafi’s death, thousands of them returned to their Saharan homeland in Niger and Mali.

But having lost access to the country that was their only source of livelihood, they came home to find little more than crushing poverty, hunger and drought.

Barely able to feed their children amidst total state neglect, the men launched a rebellion to found their own country – for which they had already chosen a flag and an old Tuareg name: Azawad.

But the Tuaregs would not be the only ones to emerge from a collapsing Libya with a lot of guns, and a plan. Al-Qaeda was also preparing for a fight

More Omanis Needed For The English Media & Press! 2

More Omanis For English Media & Press! And Strong Omani Management & Leadership!

One of the hidden dangers in our strategic outlooks is to have allowed Foreigners – mainly Indian Nationals – and some European and Others to dominate the English Media and Press – including the even Government owned The Oman Daily Observer – and others like The Times of Oman and perhaps The Tribune too.

It is a strategic fact that the locals should control and dominate these sectors. Apart from a few figure head Omanis in Management positions – the underneath layers and reporting echeleons are mainly foreigners! They make sure that they reign supreme – with contesting for positions from the locals that are usually sidelined and marginalized by these shrewd Mafias – and with real ineffective weak docile local Managers! Some of them have poor levels in English – and thus depend entirely on the expatriates in order to survive!

Like I always like to say in my columns and in my Arab Management books – www.myown-ebooks.com and www.myownmajid.com – some of these Managers are like those same very Generals shooting at ‘their own troops’ – because they do not trust their own  – and have little faith and confidence on them too!

*** The expatriates are a cunning and shrewd lot – and know this – and know how to play their cards closely to their chests! And a lot of underground below the surfaces mischief making – and causing troubles, splits and divisions amongst the Omanis! Not all of them – but a substantial lot of them – scared and afraid of their jobs – Omanis – and those wanting to say The TRUTH ONLY! For sake of The Nation!

The Omanis Top Guys are typical docile and Weak Managers – lack leadership – and ‘that do not want to rock the boats’ – and that includes not upsetting especially The Indian Mafias. This is the sad and bitter truth! Just do not take my words for it! I know – because I suffered myself many times in these aspects! Even the others say ‘quietly on the sides’ in affirming what I am saying here!

One time I had an argument with a Top Profile Press Guy (Local) when I complained about an expatriate below him who had treated me very badly unprofessionally – and unethically – he retorted to me – I can give my soul to this Indian guy when I go to sleep – and when I wake up – he will give it back to me! To which I retorted back to him – Sorry Brother – You just left the fold of The Believers in associating a human being (not even a Believer too!) to God status – and that is blasphemy least said!

For our future and for the strategic and all valid reasons – The Leadership is urged to look at this situation more critically now! Time is of the essence!

Coming from a Columnist local for 13 years – and that is why my columns died a natural cause – and Author of 10 books – 2 in Arab Management – see my websites above! Also here – www.trafford.com/08-0889Psychology of Arab Management Thinking – which won The USA Gold Seal of Literary Excellence Award 2013 – Also A Cry For Help!

usa-golden-seal[1]B - PsychologyA - A Cry For Help!

Take Care!

By – Majid Al Suleimany

*** OUTPOINT – Not all of them are anti-Omanis – like in most things – there are good fish (eggs) in each basket! Some of them – some! – are very proactive and dynamic in supporting, helping and in assisting Omanis – especially Junior ones under them – or budding New Columnists…

Lawrence of Arabia – Peter O’Toole – Dies! Reply

Stage and Screen. Personalities. pic: circa 1962. Irish born actor Peter O'Toole as he appeared in the film "Lawrence of Arabia".

Actor Peter O’Toole, who found stardom in 1962 playing T. E. Lawrence in “Lawrence of Arabia” has died, BBC News reports. He was 81.

O’Toole, who overcame a severe stomach sickness in the 1970s, died on Saturday (Dec. 14) at the Wellington hospital in London following a long illness, his agent Steve Kenis confirmed to The Guardian.

The Irish-born leading man of the stage and screen announced last year he was leaving acting behind,  saying, “I bid the profession a dry-eyed and profoundly grateful farewell.”

O’Toole was nominated for eight Academy Awards for his roles in “Lawrence of Arabia,” “Becket” (1964), “The Lion In Winter” (1968), “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” (1969), “The Ruling Class” (1972), “The Stunt Man” (1980), “My Favorite Year” (1982) and “Venus” (2006). He allegedly holds the record for the most Academy Award acting nominations without a win. O’Toole won four Golden Globes, a BAFTA and an Emmy, and was the recipient of an Honorary Academy Award in 2003.

“[He was] one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field,” Kenis told BBC News.

“His family are very appreciative and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being expressed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time,” his daughter Kate O’Toole tells Deadline. “Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts. In due course there will be a memorial filled with song and good cheer, as he would have wished. We will be happy to speak to you all then but in the meantime if you could give Peter O’Toole the respect he deserves and allow us to grieve privately we’d appreciate it. Thank you all again for your beautiful tributes – keep them coming.”

O’Toole is survived by daughters, Kate and Patricia, and son, Lorcan.

Source : HuffPost:

O’Toole is believed to have been born in Connemara in County Galway in Ireland, and lived in London. He shot to stardom in the 1962 film of TE Lawrence’s life story and went on to take leading roles in Goodbye Mr Chips, The Ruling Class, The Stunt Man and My Favourite Year. He received an honorary Oscar in 2003 after receiving  eight nominations and no wins – an unassailed record. He considered turning it down and asking the Academy to hold off until he was 80, on the basis that “I am still in the game and might win the bugger outright.”

He finally accepted, saying: “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride, my foot”.

He is survived by his two daughters, Pat and Kate O’Toole, from his marriage to actress Siân Phillips, and his son, Lorcan O’Toole, by Karen Brown.

O’Toole is believed to have been born in Connemara in County Galway in Ireland, and lived in London. He shot to stardom in the 1962 film of TE Lawrence’s life story and went on to take leading roles in Goodbye Mr Chips, The Ruling Class, The Stunt Man and My Favourite Year. He received an honorary Oscar in 2003 after receiving eight nominations and no wins – an unassailed record. He considered turning it down and asking the Academy to hold off until he was 80, on the basis that “I am still in the game and might win the bugger outright.”

He finally accepted, saying: “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride, my foot”.

He is survived by his two daughters, Pat and Kate O’Toole, from his marriage to actress Siân Phillips, and his son, Lorcan O’Toole, by Karen Brown.

The Guardian