Rwanda Genocide – Twenty Years On! Reply

Rwanda Genocide – Twenty Years On!

Twentieth Anniversary today!

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Sayings –

History will always repeat itself because humans never learn from their mistakes

George Bernard Shaw: We learn from history that we learn nothing from history.

George Santayana: Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

George Wilhelm Hegel: What experience and history teach is this — that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles.

Maya Angelou: History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.

Thucydides: History is Philosophy teaching by examples.

Unless we learn from history, we are destined to repeat it. This is no longer merely an academic exercise, but may contain our worlds fate and our destiny – Alex Haley

‘The world is too dangerous to live in – not because of the people who do evil but because of the people who sit and let it happen’. – Albert Einstein

Some Connecting Websites –

 

 

  • The world said – Never Ever Again! When over 6 million Jews were massacred in The Holocaust by Nazi Hitler Thugs!
  • The World Watched without shame – when The Palestinians were depopulated, massacred and their lands taken away with support of The West by the same peoples that were victims of The Holocaust!
  • In 1964 mainly Omanis were massacred in The Bloody Zanzibar Revolution – whilst those supposed to Protect Them  looked the other way! They too lost in the end of it all! They too lost Zanzibar!
  • This was Africa’s First Ethnic Cleansing!
  • 20 years ago – The World said NEVER AGAIN! when the Rwanda massacres took place!
  • And here we are all over again!
  • Myanamar (Burma) – Central African Republic – Syria – and others failing states following like even Egypt etc!
  • How terrible, tragic and said!
  • The human being will never ever learn – that is the terrible reality and tragedy of mankind.
  • The line between humanity and evil is so thin – and you can easily cross it anytime – especially if not looking!
  • The World – DO NOT CRY FOR US!

God Is Great! Allah Kareem!

 

Not A Question of Sour Grapes! Reply

 

Dear All & After Compliments;

Reference several posts here and at http://www.majidall.com   and http://www.majidwrite.com  concerning ending of my columns – I was able to create this website http://www.myshorttakes.com – after decline of the ‘requested Short Story’ – No Money For The Crayons for The Weekend Magazine!

As a result, my two weekly columns were killed off!

Frankly, if even the payments were regular, they amounted to OMR 300 Three Hundred a month for 9 to 10 columns a month.

Now with my websites added in, I do not have to suffer the absurd omissions of my columns – and the editing that went with some to unbelievable ridiculous proportions that even the gist of intended meaning and purpose got lost in the process.

True I have lost the monthly stipend – but I now no longer have to suffer the humiliations and marginalization with my new added website at http://www.myshorttakes.com

Please visit the site – and more here – 

http://myshorttakes.com/2014/04/03/more-emotional-touching-stories-here-2/

Enjoy! Happy Surfing!

Best Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

Frankly I am more happier now – And definitely  Not A Question of Sour Grapes!

Never Give Up A  Envy 5  Envy 3

Images For Demonstration Purposes Only!

 

 

 

Syria: The Battle Beyond 1

Syria: The Battle Beyond

Educated middle-class Syrian exiles share their thoughts on the revolution and their determination to return home.

Al Jazeera World Last updated: 19 Mar 2014 20:55

Syria The Battle Beyond

Double Click To Open

Three years ago, Syrians took to the streets   in protest against the government, and the resulting conflict has been longer   and more violent than anyone could have anticipated.

In this film, we follow the stories of Syrians   in exile who have all escaped the conflict with their lives.

The image the world often has of refugees is   of a downtrodden traveller or occupant of a squalid transit camp. But this   film is built around the experiences of educated, middle-class exiles of the   Syrian revolution – an academic, an artist, a playwright, a researcher, a   medical worker, and a women’s rights campaigner.

Now living in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, they   were all once activists in Syria. Some escaped to avoid arrest, others simply   fled the deteriorating situation.

All have individual stories – about being away   from home, missing their places of work and study, their neighbourhoods and   cafes. But they all have one thing in common – a fierce determination to   continue fighting for a ‘Free Syria’, each in their own way. They all believe   the war will ultimately end and that they will be able to go back to a free   country ruled by a democratically elected government.

In Syria: The Battle Beyond, we hear   their stories as they reflect on the struggles they face living in exile, and   their hopes of one day returning home.

Al Jazeera World can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2000; Wednesday: 1200; Thursday:     0100; Friday: 0600; Saturday: 2000; Sunday: 1200; Monday: 0100; Tuesday: 0600.

Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

Syria 1 Syria 2 SYRIA-CONFLICT-EDUCATION Syria 4 Syria 5 Syria 6 Syria ASyria 8Syria 9 (1)Syria 9 (2)Syria 10

Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

Famous Expression

There is an East African expression that goes on like this –

Those with eyes are not told to look – those with ears to hear – and those with a mouth to speak!

An expression more near at home in Arabic goes like this –

There is no one so blind with eyes but cannot see – one so deaf with ears but cannot see – and one so dumb but with a mouth but cannot speak!

And the Romans old saying –

Those that the gods want to destroy make them not see, hear or speak!

Take Care!

By

Majid Al Suleimany

Be an Indian; But Not In India! The Real Story of The NRIs! Reply

Be an Indian; But Not In India! Real  Story of NRIs!

SAD BUT TRUE! *A MUST READ…*

*From an Indian to an Indian…*

BE AN INDIAN, BUT NOT IN NDIA!

Why do they succeed outside India? Do they do the same to the Locals in other countries??

From Yahoo – East African Circle – By Pradyuman Josh

*Forwarded as received. *

Received from an *NRI businessman’s’  Group* in India

NRI refers to Non-Residents of India

*VERY INTERESTING AND TRUE! *

This is worth your time. Who ever put this together, is no fool and has the right vision about India, makes sense and is an eye opener.

I remember Brits in our own country India before independence that when Indians use to address them ‘YES, SIR!’ and joining their hands and bowing to them, as if they (Indians) were servants and Brits ‘Masters’ in India. *Imagine being a servant in ones’ own country.*

What for? Because of the white skin, privileged masters? They used and abused Indians in their own country and reduced them ‘to being stupid, suppressed them and broke down their self-esteem way down and made themselves (Brits) the masters of the slaves.

No wonder Brit’s ruled the world with that attitude and took/made us fools!

India would have been freed from Britain if our ancestors had fought and revolted against the Brits as did the Americans in the USA in the 16th century. Remember ‘the Boston Tea Party’ and other historical events where people revolted and gained independence from the colonial powers?

*Thought Provoking reasoning:*

I would like to sum up our performance in the 20th century in one sentence. Indians have succeeded in countries ruled by whites, but failed in their own. This outcome would have astonished leaders of our independence movement. They declared Indians were kept down by white rule and could flourish only under self-rule.

This seemed self-evident. The harsh reality today is that Indians are succeeding brilliantly in countries ruled by whites, but failing miserably in India. They are flourishing in the USA, Canada, UK, Europe, far east, etc.

But those that stay in India are pulled down by an outrageous system that fails to reward merit or talent, fails to allow people and businesses to grow, and keeps real power with unfaithful leaders, corrupt politicians, and selfish assorted manipulators. Once Indians go to white-ruled countries, they soar and conquer summits once occupied only by whites.

Rono Dutta has become head of United Airlines, the biggest airline in the world with a Fleet size of 705 aircrafts and 381 destinations world wide. Had he stayed in India, he would have no chance to lead in the Indian Airlines.

Even if the top job there was given to him by some godfather, the corrupt, dominating politicians and trade unionists would have ensured that he could never run it like United Airlines. Vikram Pundit was head of Citigroup until recently, which operates Citibank, one of the largest banks in the world.

Rana Talwar has become head of Standard Chartered Bank, one of the biggest multinational banks in Britain, while still in his 40s. Had he been in India, he would perhaps be a local manager in the State Bank, taking orders from politicians to give loans to politically favored clients.

Lakhsmi Mittal has become the biggest steel baron in the world, with steel plants in the US, Kazakhstan, Germany, Mexico, Trinidad and Indonesia. Indias’ socialist policies reserved the domestic steel industry for the public sector. So Lakhsmi Mittal went to Indonesia to run his family’s first steel plant there. Once freed from the shackles of India, he conquered the world.

Subhash Chandra of Zee TV has become a global media king, one of the few to beat Rupert Murdoch. He could never have risen had he been limited to India, which decreed a TV monopoly for Indian gov’t company, Doordarshan. But technology came to his aid: satellite TV made it possible for him to
target India from Hong Kong. Once he escaped Indian rules and soil, he soared.

You may not have heard of 48-year old Gururaj Deshpande. His communications company, Sycamore, is currently valued by the US stock market at over US $30 billion, making him perhaps one of the richest Indians in the world. Had he remained in India, he would probably be a politician in the Department of  Telecommunications.

Arun Netravali has become president of Bell Labs, one of the biggest research and development centers in the world with 30,000 inventions and several Nobel Prizes to its credit. Had he been in India, he would probably be struggling in the middle cadre of Indian Telephone Industries. Silicon Valley alone contains over 100,000 Indian millionaires.

Indra Krishnamurthy Nooyi has been the CEO of  PepsiCo Inc. since 2006, a Fortune 500 company.

Sabeer Bhatia invented Hotmail and sold it to Microsoft for US $400 million.

Victor Menezes, born in Pune in 1949, was number two in Citibank until late last year.

Shailesh Mehta is CEO of Providian, a top US financial services company.

Also at or near the top are Rakesh Gangwal of US Air, Jamshd Wadia of Arthur Andersen, and
Aman Mehta of Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Corp.

In Washington DC, the Indian CEO High Tech Council has no less than 200 members, all high tech-chiefs. While Indians have soared, India has been stagnated.

At its independence time, India was the most advanced of all colonies, with the best prospects.

Today with a GNP per head of $370, it occupies a lowly 177th position among 209 countries of the world. But poverty is by no means the only or main problem.

India ranks near the bottom in the United Nations’ Human Development Index, but high up in Transparency Internationals’ Corruption Index.

The politician-raj (rule) brought in by socialist policies is only one reason for Indias’ failure. The more sordid reason is the rule-based society we inherited from the British Raj, is in tatters today. Instead
money, muscle and influence matter the most.

At independence we were justly proud of our politicians. Today, we regard them as scoundrels and criminals. They have created a jungle of laws in the holy name of socialism, and used these to line their pockets and create patronage networks. No influential crook suffers. The Indian Mafias flourish unhindered because they have political links.

The sons of police officers, politicians, rich people believe they have a license to rape and kill and get away from being charged criminally or prosecuted. Talent cannot take you far amid such bad governance.

We are reverting to our ancient feudal system where no rules applied to the powerful ones. The British Raj brought in abstract concepts of justice for all, equality before the law. These were maintained in the early years of independence. But, sixty years later, citizens wail that India is a lawless land where no rules are obeyed.

I have heard of an IAS probationer at the Delhi training academy pointing out that in India before the British came, making money and distributing favors to relatives was not considered a perversion of power, it was the very rationale of power. A feudal official had a duty to enrich his family and caste.

Then the British came and imposed a new ethical code on officials. But, he asked, why should we continue to choose British customs over Indian ones now that we are independent?

The lack of transparent rules, properly enforced, is a major reason why talented Indians cannot rise in India. A second reason is the politician-raj, which remains intact despite supposed liberalization. But,
once talented Indians go to rule-based societies in the west, they take off. In those societies all people play by the same rules, all have freedom to innovate without being strangled by regulations.

This, then, is why Indians succeed in countries ruled by Non-Indians, and fail in their own.

*It is the saddest story of the century for Indians and India.

From Yahoo – East African Circle – By Pradyuman Joshi

NRI 5 NRI 4 NRI 3 NRI 1 NR 2 NRI 6 NRI A

Images For Demonstration Purposes Only!

3. Fwd: FW: SAD but TRUE. A MUST READ!!
Posted by: “Pradyuman Joshi” papla1860@gmail.com
Date: Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:57 am ((PDT))

Date: Sat, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:14 AM
Subject: INDIANS & INDIA: SAD but TRUE…

Saudi officials shut down display at book fair Reply

Saudi officials shut down display at book fair

Summary 

At this year’s Riyadh International Book Fair, greatly anticipated by Saudi writers and intellectuals, a display by a new press run by Saudis out of Beirut was ransacked and shut down.

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Author Madawi Al-Rasheed

Posted March 13, 2014

A man shows a book by Saudi writer and poet Al-Rotayyan during the Riyadh Book Fair in Riyadh

A man shows a book by Saudi writer and poet Mohamed al-Rotayyan during the Riyadh Book Fair at the International Exhibition Center in Riyadh, March 9, 2013.  (photo by REUTERS/Faisal Al Nassar)

*** Author: Madawi Al-Rasheed – Al Monitor

Posted March 13, 2014

Saudi Arabia boasts about the annual Riyadh International Book Fair, where Saudis can explore a flourishing book market, meet authors and engage in intellectual discussion. Every year, however, the book fair is transformed from an intellectual market into something more resembling a battle for the hearts and minds of Saudis. The gathering has become an arena in which multiple actors want to assert their presence, control the event and dictate what Saudis should and should not read. During the 2014 book fair, this struggle resulted in visitors on March 7 posting photos online of the destruction inflicted the night before on the booth of the Arab Network for Research and Publishing, a relatively new press based in Beirut.

Many writers and readers look forward to the annual book event, which breaks up the monotony of intellectual life in the kingdom and allows them to enjoy a different kind of consumption. The government promotes the book fair under the auspices of the Ministry of Information, while security agents, accompanied by members of the Committee for Promoting Virtue and Prohibiting Vice, otherwise known as the religious police, search for books to confiscate and destroy. They also look for any signs of mingling between the sexes and flirtatious behavior deemed to undermine public order. 

A group of young Saudi intellectuals, including Judge Abdulaziz al-Qasim and the journalist Nawaf al-Qudaimi, established the Arab Network for Research and Publishing to promote books offering new perspectives on society, religion and politics.

As the press’ director, Qudaimi worked hard to create a significant collection of books written by Saudis and other Arabs, all presenting new interpretations of history and religious tradition with a view toward reconstructing consciousness and promoting an examination of past and current knowledge.

The press also translates books from other languages, primarily academic English books on Saudi Arabia and other countries. Days before the book fair, Qudaimi had begun to promote the press’ 2014 list, tweeting short promotional materials and summaries of the awaited titles. He was granted permission to display the publishing house’s collection in a designated corner at the Riyadh book fair.

The press’ books arrived and were displayed as expected. Qudaimi’s early publicity effort was so successful that a number of Saudis were looking forward to purchasing copies of their favorite volumes. They were disappointed, however, when they arrived to find the ransacking of the press’ display a day after the book fair opened its doors. Books and papers were scattered and thrown from the tables set up for their exhibition. Thus, the press was only able to display its collection for a very short time before being closed down.

Among Saudi liberals speculating about the reasons behind the raid, the majority prefer to blame the religious police, absolving the regime from any wrongdoing. This is an easy way out for them, because they would like to think of the regime as a bastion of enlightenment working against a tide of religious conservatism, bigotry and radicalization.

They have exhausted this myth, however, and instead live under the illusion that King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz is a reformer, working hard to open Saudi Arabia to new ideas and curb the influence of radical groups across the society. They cheered when a recent royal decree promised to punish radical groups and designate them as terrorists. The raid at the book fair affirms the myth’s collapse.

The raid not only proves that reform in Saudi Arabia is in short supply, but confirms that the regime is not serious about fighting terrorism. Freedom of expression is not by any means an unlimited right, but it is a precondition for open debate, including tackling the roots of violence. Without people being able to engage in free debate, read alternative interpretations and expose themselves to new ideas, the regime is fighting a lost cause. In fact, the raid proves that the government does not want to create the intellectual conditions for new ways of thinking and behaving.

The raided publications hardly contain any radical ideas, blasphemy or immoral material. In fact, several volumes deconstruct the roots of Wahhabi teachings, in particular those that would perpetuate repression at the personal and political levels, promote violence and suppress people’s rights. Many authors are critical of old Wahhabi teachings that promote rejection of democracy and civil and political rights.

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A tweet with a picture of the booth before and after (Twitter/ @Alqudaimi)

A common theme runs through many books in which some authors search for ways to free the Islamic tradition from the authority of religious scholars whose interpretations have become sacred, especially in Saudi Arabia. Rather than exporting Wahhabi ideas, these Saudi authors draw on the work of modernist scholars in North Africa and elsewhere to reconstruct Islamic interpretations suitable for modern society. Many volumes offer a serious critique of Islamists in Saudi Arabia, highlighting their shortcomings in preparing people for demanding their rights.

The book fair raid indicates that such a collection of books has been designated a threat to Saudi national security. The regime, however, cannot fight terrorism simply by arresting terrorists and criminalizing radical language that might incite violence. It should allow people to engage in alternative ways of emancipating themselves and freeing their conscience from the oppressive preaching that still dominates the country.

The regime knows very well, however, that this freedom is inevitably bound to sweep away the political repression that sustains, finances and nourishes those whose main objective is to control the hearts and minds of citizens. As a regime founded on a holy marriage with Wahhabism, one of the most rigid Islamic traditions, considered by some as Islam par excellence, it knows all too well that its survival is dependent on Wahhabism remaining a revered corpus of religious thought.

The Saudi regime is keen to prepare Saudis for the afterlife, but the raided books aim to prepare them for this life, hence they were targeted in a way that demonstrates how dangerous this perspective is viewed. Books that praise the pious rulers of the country, congratulate them on their development projects and commend their support of Islamic causes are well-guarded on the book fair’s shelves. Also those publications that teach one how to ablute during water shortages remain abundant, but those that prepare people to pursue their rights as citizens or deconstruct mythologized history are banned.

No historical or political change can be forthcoming without a paradigm shift that dismantles traditional ways of thinking and replaces them with new perspectives. The regime fears this shift and is determined to suppress its slow birth. The Saudi regime is fighting a losing battle in the age of new media, during which books can circulate in electronic form. Its raid only sparked curiosity and increased people’s determination to search for the destroyed publications online.

The iron curtain has already fallen, and Saudi authors are themselves the new archaeologists with sturdy trowels for excavating a fossilized body of religious and political thought. The famous 10th-century Arab poet Abu al-Tayib al-Mutanabi said that the sword is mightier than the pen, but weak and troubled regimes, such as the Saudis’, seem to fear the pen more than the sword

*** Dr. Madawi Al-Rasheed is a columnist for Al-Monitor and a visiting professor at the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has written extensively about the Arabian Peninsula, Arab migration, globalization, religious trans-nationalism and gender. On Twitter: @MadawiDr

Blacklist companies, not just punish corrupt officials – Saleh Al Shaibany 1

Saleh Al Shaibany

Blacklist companies, not just punish corrupt officials –

Sunday Beat – Times of Oman – March 16, 2014

Saleh Al Shaibany

http://www.timesofoman.com/News/Article-31123.aspx

RELATED STORIES 

  Sunday Beat: Oman   needs strict laws to combat corruption

  Sunday Beat: The   corrupt should not escape the consequences

Real justice will not be done until companies whose senior   officials have been convicted on corruption charges are either blacklisted   for a number of years from bidding for the government tenders, or made to pay   heavy fines.

We should follow the regulations the rest of the world   does to make companies accountable for the actions of their employees   representing them.

The excuse that the board of directors cite by saying,   “we knew nothing about it”, does not wash when it is their job to   know about it. It defies logic when hundreds of thousands of rials disappear   in the company’s bank accounts and the chairman says “it escaped my   notice” or simply that “it was hidden from my view” and the   courts believe that statement. A CEO or a managing director will not   authorise the accountant to use the company’s money to bribe a government   official unless he has approval from someone in the board. There is always   that prior arrangement of “you go ahead with it but I will deny it if   you are caught” type of thing which means the bribe had the blessing   from the top.

For justice to go around a full 360 degrees instead of   doing a semi circle, the Oman Tender Board (OTB) must ban the bribing   companies for at least 10 years from any future activities. It is no excuse   that these companies, just because they employ hundreds of Omanis, should get   away with it. If they are allowed to bid again, then they should pay a fine   equivalent to the bid value of the contract in which they were accused of   offering bribe.

Otherwise, it will be morally wrong when one or two   employees, acting under certain instructions, should be made scapegoats for   something bigger than them without any consequences to the company   itself.

The shocking thing is that while the company is being   investigated for bribery charges, it is still in the running to win the next   contract of the project they had bid for prior to the court case. It is like   telling a school boy “don’t climb this tree again but you can climb the   other one at the back but make sure you don’t fall this time.”

Then there is a question of the auditing companies. How   does it escape their expert scrutiny when a large amount of cash was not   accountable for? If a company is listed in the Muscat Securities Market (MSM)   or in the case of a government organisation, surely the auditors must spot   any financial irregularities. If not, where are they looking?

To say that the financials are hidden from their full   scrutiny is again a lame excuse for not doing their job or simply taking for   granted that “all is well” when it is not, as we now find out. For   listed companies, it is the investors’ money that is used to bribe for   contracts where the board of directors are the trustees. It is not business   ethics, as one insider speculated. “Bribery money is the board of   directors’ way of increasing profits for their investors.”

What about the role of the State Financial and   Administrative Audit Institution when it comes to scrutinise the accounts of   the government’s organisations and their employees? We expect such an   institution with wide powers to put under the spotlight any financial   irregularity committed by officials, especially those at the very top, to act   decisively and timely to win the public’s confidence.

If we argue if we should make board of directors of   private companies responsible for their actions, then it makes perfect sense   to make heads of the ministries take responsibility for the spate of   corruption cases in their patches. If their response is that “we were   not aware of it”, then questions should be asked about their competence.   Somebody else should be appointed who will be “aware of it” when it   starts to happen again.

To sum it all up, corrupt companies should not simply   plead ignorance and blame it on their managers to survive to make money   another day. Similarly, heads of ministries cannot shrug their shoulders by   claiming lack of knowledge. It is part of their responsibility and the buck   stops with them. The time for cover-up has long passed. 

You can get in touch with the writer: saleh@timesofoman.com

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REPRODUCED ARTICLE

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage! By Saleh Al Shaibany Reply

Saleh Al Shaibany

http://www.timesofoman.com/News/Article-28760.aspx  

Brain drain could end up doing irreversible damage

Sunday Beat – By Saleh Al Shaibany – Times of Oman – January 26th 2014

Muscat: The depressing reality is that Oman is beginning     to witness its human capital transferring to other countries for the simple     reason that the Sultanate cannot anymore satisfy the higher wages that its     skilled workers demand.

Talented local workers with years of experience are looking for better paid jobs abroad leaving the country in a brain drain zone. The gap they leave behind cannot be filled by graduates. The human flight can do an irreversible damage on a long-term basis if employers continue to pay low wages to its most experienced Omani staff.

And the problem is deeper than that. Oman is also losing its new talents as well for greener pastures.

With the government investing so much money in education and vocational training, the job opportunities need to match the  college and university leaving students’ expectations for wages. For the record, the Ministry of Finance has allocated OMR2.6 billion for education this year, twice the budget allocated for the same sector last year. The huge capital investment will need to translate into better paid jobs if we have to keep young talents right here at home.

Most of the Omanis who are leaving are emigrating to other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and the prime targets are the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. That means that we are losing professionals and skilled workers that the government has paid millions at different levels of training and education. The areas in which we now face the brain drain are in Information Technology (IT), medicine, the financial sector  and academia. In a fledgling economy like Oman, we cannot leave talent gaps and then hope that things will remain alright. Employers must match the wages paid by our neighbours instead of hoping that someone from abroad will fill these positions when Omanis vacate them. For that to happen, attitudes must also change.

Top on the list is trusting local skills. Oman has     become so dependent on importing talent and the mind set is now embedded deep among the employers that only foreign workers can do a better job.     These employers are now being proved pleasantly wrong. While we shun our own skills, the GCC states hold these in high esteem and companies there     start to poach Omani talents. So where does it leave the huge effort of the     government which is spending about OMR4 billion a year on projects, trade     subsidies and education to inject funds in the private sector? Yes, it does     create jobs but now Omanis want to be paid enough to compensate for their talents.

It took 40 years to create a powerhouse of local skills. The ammunition of that powerhouse is better financial packages. Omani managers know that they are worth much more across the border than here.

In the UAE or in Qatar, a senior IT manager with 10 to 15 years of experience gets a monthly package of around OMR7,000. Here, they only get paid about OMR3,500. New doctors get a maximum of OMR700 per month in the Sultanate. They would get paid about OMR2,500 when they land     jobs in those two countries. One would say it is not exactly patriotism to abandon one’s country in its moment of need but better standard of living     is what drives people these days.

The funny thing is that 20 years ago, Oman barely had any experienced and skilled people to work in the high profile jobs in the private sector. It was natural to import these talents from different countries to push the wheel of development forward. It is a different scenario now. We have the right people now but we are beginning to export local talents when it is mostly needed here. The trend is threatening to wipe out any advancement we made in the last two decades in the build up of skilled workforce.  The result, if we don’t watch out, is the loss of senior managers to foreign bidders and that will give the Omanisation process a severe knock.

It goes without saying that to continue to compete on the global basis, Oman must invest on its local workers by paying them much more than the present wage scales if it wants to retain its skills.

END

Saddam Remained Strong Until The End! Reply

Source AFP
Friday, Dec 27, 2013
Saddam 1 Saddam 2
Bust of Saddam and The Hanging Rope! Defiant Saddam in Court! Images for Demonstration Purposes only!

BAGHDAD – Mowaffak al-Rubaie sits in his office with a statue of Saddam Hussein behind him, the rope used to hang the dictator around its neck, recalling his final minutes.

The former national security advisor, who oversaw Saddam’s 2006 execution, said he remained strong until the end, and never expressed any regret. “A criminal? True. A killer? True. A butcher? True. But he was strong until the end.

“I received him (Saddam) at the door. No one entered with us – no foreigners, and no Americans,” Rubaie said in an interview with AFP at his office in the Kadhimiyah area of north Baghdad, near the prison where the execution took place seven years ago.

“He was wearing a jacket and a white shirt, normal and relaxed, and I didn’t see any signs of fear.

“Of course, some people want me to say that he collapsed or that he was drugged, but these facts are for history,” Rubaie said.

“I didn’t hear any regret from him, I didn’t hear any request for mercy from God from him, or request for pardon.

“A person who is about to die usually says, ‘God, forgive my sins – I am coming to you.’ But he never said any of that,” Rubaie told AFP.

Saddam Hussein, who ruled Iraq for more than two decades marked by brutal repression, disastrous wars and punishing international sanctions, was hanged after being found guilty of crimes against humanity for the 1982 killing of 148 Shiite villagers in Dujail.

He was president from July 1979 until the March 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq, and was found by American forces hiding in a hole on a farm in December of that year.

Saddam was executed three years later on December 30, 2006 after a summary trial.

Hanging Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein being hanged! Images for Demonstration Purposes only!

Some Iraqis, particularly Sunni Arabs, look back fondly on the time of Saddam’s rule, especially the periods of internal stability that stand in stark contrast to the brutal violence that has plagued the country since his overthrow.

Saddam is also held in high regard by some Arabs for his 1980-88 war with Iran, his confrontations with the United States, his strikes against Israel, and his composure during his execution, which was recorded on mobile phone videos.

‘This is for men’

“When I brought him, he was handcuffed and holding a Quran,” said Rubaie, ignoring the statue of Saddam behind him, which depicts the dictator dressed in a uniform bearing the insignia of his exclusive military rank.

“I took him to the judge’s room, where he read the list of indictments, as Saddam repeated: ‘Death to America! Death to Israel! Long live Palestine! Death to the Persian magi!”

Rubaie then took Saddam to the room in which he was to die.

“He stopped, looked at the gallows, then he looked me up and down… and said: ‘Doctor, this is for men’.”

When it was time for Saddam to mount the gallows, his legs were still bound, so Rubaie and others had to drag him up the steps.

Just before he was hanged, witnesses taunted him with shouts of “Long live Imam Mohammed Baqr al-Sadr!” and “Moqtada! Moqtada!” – references to an opponent of Saddam who was killed during his rule, and the dead man’s relative, who rose to command a powerful militia after 2003.

Saddam replied: “Is this manhood?”

Rubaie said he pulled the lever to hang Saddam, but it did not work.

Another person he did not name then pulled it a second time, killing him. Just before he was hanged, Saddam began to recite the Muslim testament of faith.

“I testify that there is no god but God, and Mohammed…,” he began, but he was hanged before he could say the final words, “is the messenger of God.”

Rubaie went under the gallows to retrieve the body, which he said was put in a white bag and placed on a stretcher.

The body was then transported in an American helicopter from the prison where he was hanged to Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki’s residence in the heavily-fortified Green Zone.

The helicopter was crowded with people, Rubaie said, so the body had to be put on the floor, and the doors of the helicopter were left open during the flight, as the stretcher was too long to fit otherwise.

“I remember clearly that the sun was starting to rise” as the helicopter flew over Baghdad, Rubaie said.

‘The room was full of death’

At his residence, “the prime minister took our hands and said: ‘God bless you.’ I told him, ‘Go ahead and look at him.’ So he uncovered his face, and saw Saddam Hussein,” said Rubaie, who is still a close ally of the premier.

“I have never had such a very strange feeling,” Rubaie, who was thrice imprisoned during Saddam’s rule, said of participating in the execution.

“He committed countless crimes, and he deserved to be hanged a thousand times, live again, and be hanged again. But the feeling, that feeling is a strange feeling,” he said. “The room was full of death.”

Rubaie said Saddam’s execution was set in motion after a video conference between Maliki and then US president George Bush, who asked the Iraqi prime minister: “What are you going to do with this criminal?”

Maliki replied: “We hang him.”

Bush gave him a thumbs up, signalling his approval.

Source – AFP

From The Man of The Year to being hanged by the very same! Will we Arabs wake up from this deep slumber we are in?

Mau Mau torture victims to receive Compensation! Reply

Mau Mau torture victims to receive

compensation – Hague

Mau Mau veterans gathered for a press conference on the government announcement
 
Mau Mau veterans gathered for a press conference on the government announcement
 
Kenyans tortured by British colonial forces during the Mau Mau uprising will receive payouts totalling £20m, Foreign Secretary William Hague has announced.

He said the UK government recognised Kenyans were tortured and it “sincerely regrets” the abuses that took place.

A lawyer for the victims said they “at last have the recognition and justice they have sought for many years”.

Thousands of people were killed during the Mau Mau revolt against British rule in Kenya in the 1950s.

Mr Hague also announced plans to support the construction of a permanent memorial to the victims in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

‘Unreservedly condemn’

‘Battered and left for dead’

Kenya torture claimant Wambuga Wa Nyingi

Wambuga Wa Nyingi, 84, detailed his torture at the hands of the British colonial authorities in a witness statement.

He was a tractor driver and member of the pro-independence Kenya African Union – but never took the Mau Mau oath.

He survived the Hola massacre in 1959, when 11 Kenyans were beaten to death by prison guards in a detention camp.

He said: “I was battered on the back of my head and around my neck repeatedly with a club. I believe that the beating went on for up to 20 minutes…

“I lay unconscious with the 11 corpses for two days in a room where the corpses had been placed awaiting burial.

“The people who put me there thought I was also dead, but I was in fact unconscious.”

“I would like to like to make clear now, and for the first time, on behalf of Her Majesty’s government, that we understand the pain and grievance felt by those who were involved in the events of the emergency in Kenya,” he told the Commons.

“The British government recognises that Kenyans were subject to torture, and other forms of ill-treatment at the hands of the colonial administration.

“The British government sincerely regrets that these abuses took place and that they marred Kenya’s progress towards independence.”

Mr Hague said 5,228 victims would receive payments totalling £19.9m following an agreement with lawyers acting for the victims, who have been fighting for compensation for a number of years.

Mau Mau 1 Mau Mau 2 Mau Mau 3

Images MauMau – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

But he said Britain still did not accept it was legally liable for the actions of what was a colonial administration in Kenya.

The British High Commissioner in Nairobi also made a public statement on the settlement to members of the Mau Mau War Veterans’ Association in Kenya.

BBC east Africa correspondent Gabriel Gatehouse said the reaction there was “muted”.

‘Big milestone’

He said it may have been because the announcement had been expected or because it was marred by the UK government continuing to deny liability for some of the abuses.

 

 

William Hague: “[We] sincerely regret that these abuses took place”

That said, it was a “big milestone” for the Mau Mau veterans, said our correspondent.

In a statement, Martyn Day, of law firm Leigh Day, said it took “courage to publically acknowledge for the first time the terrible nature of Britain’s past in Kenya”.

“The elderly victims of torture now at last have the recognition and justice they have sought for many years. For them this significance of this moment cannot be over emphasised,” he said.

But Bryan Cox QC, of Tandem Law, said there were “thousands” of further claims that remain unresolved and “the matter was far from over”.

Background

  • The Mau Mau, a guerrilla group, began as a violent campaign against white settlers in 1952
  • The uprising was eventually put down by the British colonial government
  • The Kenya Human Rights Commission says 90,000 Kenyans were executed, tortured or maimed
  • It says 160,000 people were detained in appalling conditions
  • Kenya gained independence in 1963

He said the law firm was working with more than 8,000 Kenyans who were still awaiting an agreement with the UK government.

Mau Mau 5 Jomo Kenyata Mau Mau 6 Mau Mau A

The UK has argued that all liabilities for the torture by colonial authorities was transferred to the Kenyan Republic upon independence in 1963 and that it could not be held liable now.

But in 2011, the High Court in London ruled that four claimants did have “arguable cases in law”.

Their lawyers allege Paulo Muoka Nzili was castrated, Wambuga Wa Nyingi was severely beaten and Jane Muthoni Mara was subjected to appalling sexual abuse in detention camps during the rebellion. A fourth claimant, Ndiku Mutwiwa Mutua, died last year.

‘Historic judgement’

After the ruling, the case went back to the High Court to consider a claim by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) that the actions had been brought outside the legal time limit.

The FCO said it had faced “irredeemable difficulties” in relation to the availability of witnesses and documents.

Wambuga Wa Nyingi, Jane Muthoni Mara, Paulo Muoka Nzili and Ndiku Mutwiwa Mutua outside the Royal Courts of Justice in April
 
The test case was originally brought by four Kenyans, one of whom has since died

But in October last year, the court ruled the victims had established a proper case and allowed their claims to proceed to trial despite the time elapsed.

At the time, victims’ lawyer Mr Day said he would be pressing for a trial “as quickly as possible” but would also be pushing for the government to reach an out-of-court settlement.

The Mau Mau, a guerrilla group, began a violent campaign against white settlers in 1952, but the uprising was eventually put down by the British colonial government.

The Kenya Human Rights Commission says 90,000 Kenyans were executed, tortured or maimed, and 160,000 people were detained in appalling conditions, although a number of historians believe the figure is lower.

THE BIQ QUESTION NOW!!

WHATABOUT AL NAQBA? WHAT ABOUT THE POOR PALESTINIANS? THEIR CASE IS FAR SERIOUS – THE MAUMAU STILL HAVE THEIR LAND – THE PALESTINIANS LOST EVERYTHING THRU BRITISH ZIONISTS ANTI SEMITIC THE PALESTINIANS TREATMENT!!

WHAT A SHAME!

Most Racist Countries of the World! Reply

 

‘Most Racist’ countries  of the World!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html#ixzz2Tf1KMtEC

Washington Post: A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries

Map shows world’s ‘Most Racist’ countries

(and the answers may surprise you!)

  • *** Hong Kong, Bangladesh, Jordan and India named least tolerant countries
  • U.S., Britain, Canada and South America are among the least racist
  • Survey asks people if they would want neighbours of a different race

By Hugo Gye

17 May 2013

Britain is one of the most racially tolerant countries on the planet, a survey claims.

The global social attitudes study claims that the most racially intolerant populations are all in the developing world, with Bangladesh, Jordan and India in the top five.

By contrast, the study of 80 countries over three decades found Western countries were most accepting of other cultures with Britain, the U.S., Canada and Australia more tolerant than anywhere else.

Map

 

Racism: This map shows the nations of the world where people have the most and least tolerant attitudes

The data came from the World Value Survey, which measured the social attitudes of people in different countries, as reported by the Washington Post.

The survey asked individuals what types of people they would refuse to live next to, and counted how many chose the option ‘people of a different race’ as a percentage for each country.

More…

Researchers have suggested that societies where more people do not want neighbours from other races can be considered less racially tolerant.

The country with the highest proportion of ‘intolerant’ people who wanted neighbours similar to them was Hong Kong, where 71.8 per cent of the population would refuse to live next to someone of a different race.

Next were Bangladesh on 71.7 per cent, Jordan on 51.4 per cent and India with 43.5 per cent.

 

Hongkong

Intolerant: A survey found that Hong Kong had the most people professing racist views of any country

Racist views are strikingly rare in the U.S., according to the survey, which claims that only 3.8 per cent of residents are reluctant to have a neighbour of another race.

Other English-speaking countries once part of the British Empire shared the same tolerant attitude – fewer than five per cent of Britons, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders showed signs of racism.

People in the UK are also tolerant of other differences such as speaking a foreign language or practising an alternative religion – for example, fewer than two per cent of Britons would object to having neighbours of a different faith to them.

Similarly, fewer than one in 20 people in most South American countries admitted harbouring prejudice against other races.

 New York

Diverse: The multicultural U.S. is among the least racially intolerant countries, according to the data

The Middle East, which is currently dealing with large numbers of low-skilled immigrants from south Asia, seems to be a hotbed of racial tension, however.

Europe is remarkably split – the west of the continent is generally more tolerant than the east, but France is a striking outlier with 22.7 per cent of the French rejecting neighbourhood diversity.

Some have pointed out problems in the survey data, claiming that because the polls span a long period of time they are an unreliable guide to current attitudes.

However, a more serious flaw could be the fact that in most Western countries racism is so taboo than many people will hide their intolerant views and lie to the questioners.

Max Fisher of the Washington Post suggested that maybe ‘Americans are conditioned by their education and media to keep these sorts of racial preferences private, i.e. to lie about them on surveys, in a way that Indians might not be’.

THE LEAST RACIALLY TOLERANT COUNTRIES

40%+ (of individuals surveyed would not want a person of another race as a neighbour)
India, Jordan, Bangladesh, Hong Kong

30 – 39.9%
Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Korea

20 – 39.9%
France, Turkey, Bulgaria, Algeria, Morocco, Mali, Zambia, Thailand, Malaysia, The Philippines

THE MOST TOLERANT COUNTRIES

0 to 4.9%
United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Guatemala, Britain, Sweden, Norway, Latvia, Australia, New Zealand

5 – 9.9%
Chile, Peru, Mexico, Spain, Germany, Belgium, Belarus, Croatia, Japan, Pakistan, South Africa

10 – 14.9%
Finland, Poland, Ukraine, Italy, Greece, Czech Republic, Slovakia

15 – 19.9%
Venezuela, Hungary, Serbia, Romania, Macedonia, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Russia, China

Source: World Values Survey

Read more:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html#ixzz2Tf1KMtEC

*** My Comments

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The Author – Majid Al Suleimany