Syria: The Battle Beyond 1

Syria: The Battle Beyond

Educated middle-class Syrian exiles share their thoughts on the revolution and their determination to return home.

Al Jazeera World Last updated: 19 Mar 2014 20:55

Syria The Battle Beyond

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Three years ago, Syrians took to the streets   in protest against the government, and the resulting conflict has been longer   and more violent than anyone could have anticipated.

In this film, we follow the stories of Syrians   in exile who have all escaped the conflict with their lives.

The image the world often has of refugees is   of a downtrodden traveller or occupant of a squalid transit camp. But this   film is built around the experiences of educated, middle-class exiles of the   Syrian revolution – an academic, an artist, a playwright, a researcher, a   medical worker, and a women’s rights campaigner.

Now living in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, they   were all once activists in Syria. Some escaped to avoid arrest, others simply   fled the deteriorating situation.

All have individual stories – about being away   from home, missing their places of work and study, their neighbourhoods and   cafes. But they all have one thing in common – a fierce determination to   continue fighting for a ‘Free Syria’, each in their own way. They all believe   the war will ultimately end and that they will be able to go back to a free   country ruled by a democratically elected government.

In Syria: The Battle Beyond, we hear   their stories as they reflect on the struggles they face living in exile, and   their hopes of one day returning home.

Al Jazeera World can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2000; Wednesday: 1200; Thursday:     0100; Friday: 0600; Saturday: 2000; Sunday: 1200; Monday: 0100; Tuesday: 0600.

Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

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Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

Famous Expression

There is an East African expression that goes on like this –

Those with eyes are not told to look – those with ears to hear – and those with a mouth to speak!

An expression more near at home in Arabic goes like this –

There is no one so blind with eyes but cannot see – one so deaf with ears but cannot see – and one so dumb but with a mouth but cannot speak!

And the Romans old saying –

Those that the gods want to destroy make them not see, hear or speak!

Take Care!

By

Majid Al Suleimany

A Passage To Nowhere! Reply

We have heard the Israeli version of how they treat immigrants – now this is the version of how Arabs treat Arabs that are immigrants! Internal Displaced People (Person) IDPs!

Sad and tragic really! Made me weep – not cry!

Undocumented migrants and refugees in Lebanon reflect on the trials of a rootless and helpless existence

This home felt just like a prison!

We felt like we were just like prisoners!

A Passage To NowhereNo PassagePassage B

In the coming storms – simply no one will be spared – simply no one! Because of bad hearts at work – and everyone thinks they are right and correct only always!

A Passage to Nowhere!

Published on Feb 25, 2014

A story of migrants in Lebanon, whose dreams of finding a new life abroad often turn out to be little more than fantasy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_kzxFV8GDI

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/aljazeeraworld/2014/02/passage-nowhere-201422112599271691.html

For years before Syrian refugees began flooding over the border into Lebanon, undocumented migrants from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and Sudan have been making the hazardous journey there. This film hears from the refugees themselves, about why they came to Lebanon in the first place, what their lives are like, and where they hope to eventually be.

For years before Syrian refugees began flooding over the border into Lebanon, undocumented migrants from Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and Sudan have been making the hazardous journey there.

Most of them do so in the often vain hope of being relocated by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to Europe, the US or Canada.

To get to Lebanon, they cross borders and rough terrain. But when they get there, they live on the margins of society and often have to stay far longer than expected.

This film hears from the refugees themselves, about why they came to Lebanon in the first place, what their lives are like, and where they hope to eventually be.

Through three main characters – a Sudanese woman, a young Iraqi, and a Syrian man – the film tells the story of their alienation from mainstream society and their prolonged wait to have their cases processed.

For many migrants, the dream of starting a new life abroad often turns out to be nothing more than a fantasy. Sometimes they never leave, and their journey to Lebanon is truly just a ‘passage to nowhere’

Syria overtakes Afghanistan as the country with the highest refugees in the world! Watch Ukraine now!

*****

Ernest Hemingway

“For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them.”

Orphans of the Sahara. 1

Orphans of the Sahara

Documented on Al Jazeera

 Thu, 09 Jan 2014 11:45
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Orphans of the Sahara is a documentary series about the heartbreaking circumstances of life for the Sahara’s Tuareg people, one of the most isolated and impoverished groups in the world.

May Welsh, award-winning Al Jazeera filmmaker, captures the complex conflict and events in Mali and Niger as they unfold within the Tuareg community.

Due to the presence of al-Qaeda, these desert people have been cut off from aid workers and the rest of the outside world. Welsh’s three films offer viewers rare and exclusive access and insight to the Tuareg separatist struggle in their homeland as well as exploring the rival al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.

Welsh comments, “The Tuareg story is one of an extremely impoverished people whose land harbours the largest energy reserves on the African continent, and who have been fighting for various forms of self-determination for 50 years.”

The first film in the three-part series, Orphans of the Sahara – Return, documents how thousands of Gaddafi’s Tuareg mercenaries return to their Saharan homeland after fleeing from Libya. Terrible poverty, hunger and drought await them in the areas to which they return which are spread across northern Niger and northern Mali.

With few other skills and largely unable to feed their children, the men in Mali rise up to establish their own country while those in Niger risk their lives to return to Libya.

“The story of my son is a man chased by poverty. Hunger that you can see if you look at the women and children around us. He was forced to travel to Libya, so he went. It wasn’t a choice,” says Amamatou Bint Tigzali, mother of a Tuareg fighter.

Orphans of the Sahara – Return, airs on Al Jazeera English on 9 January at 20h00 GMT.

Watch and embed the promo at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4ADnH- 6UbI.

To us the Sahara means our origins. We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It represents our real nation.

Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, lead singer of Tinariwen

The Tuareg of the Sahara   are a people orphaned, literally and figuratively, the filmmaker writes [Al   Jazeera]

The Tuareg of the Sahara desert are a people orphaned, literally   and figuratively, by colonial history and borders, by distant governments, by   poverty, corporate exploitation, pollution, drought, and war.

Their Saharan homeland stretches across five countries and   straddles the largest energy deposits in Africa. And they have risen up   against their governments seven times in the past 50 years to demand forms of   autonomy and independence.

Yet the decades-long Tuareg struggle is one of the world’s least   covered stories.

In Orphans of the Sahara,   Al Jazeera takes the viewer deep inside the Tuareg world.

To us the Sahara means our     origins. We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It     represents our real nation. 

Ibrahim     Ag Alhabib, lead singer of Tinariwen

We will go to their impoverished camps in the desert where life   hangs by a thread, journey inside “Azawad”, the unrecognised Tuareg   state in northern Mali, and into Timbuktu under al-Qaeda control. We will   travel to the French uranium mining zone in northern Niger, an area now out   of bounds to journalists, and into the refugee camps in exile, where Tuaregs   and Arabs are calling for an independent state.

This is a story you won’t see or hear anywhere else. For a   number of years, the Tuareg have been cut off from the world, surrounded by a   vast “red zone” of al-Qaeda kidnappings and killings, preventing   journalists, aid workers and tourists from travelling to the places where the   Tuareg really live.

As a result, they have become increasingly isolated and poorly   understood – seen and interpreted for the outside world through the eyes of   their enemies. They have few friends and no state allies.

Their music has been one of the only genuine insights the   outside world has into their stories and struggles. And for many Tuareg   bands, their songs are a way to relay the message of their people and help   the world understand their plight.

‘A generation of orphans’

“I was young when the army took my father from here,”   he said. “They took him and killed him. And then they killed our   animals. I left with my grandmother for Algeria. And I grew up there. I   always think about that day and this area.”

In exile, Ibrahim met other Tuareg youths with similar stories   and experiences. Together they learned how to fight in Muammar Gaddafi’s   military training camps in Libya. Then, in 1990, they returned in their   thousands to Mali and Niger where they launched rebellions against their   governments to fight for their rights as a people.

We spent hours mesmerised by Ibrahim’s stories and thoughts as   he smoked cigarettes, slowly searching for the right words, often staring out   through the crack of the door into the sand storm whirling around us.

The last thing he said was “my generation of Tuareg is a   generation of orphans”. It was really important to him that we   understand his story was no different to those of thousands of others who   became rebels – that his pain was not unique.

After we returned to Doha, I put Ibrahim’s interview on a shelf   and forgot about it. We are a news channel and I wasn’t sure what to do with   such a long and deep interview on a subject that is obscure to most people   and requires a lot of background and explaining. But he and his words lodged   somewhere deep in my consciousness.

In late 2011, Al Jazeera returned to the region to document the   new exodus of Tuaregs back to northern Mali and Niger following the fall of   Gaddafi in Libya. We noticed a high proportion of orphans, both among the   young returning Tuareg mercenaries, and among the families they were   supporting in the desert.

In 2008, Al Jazeera met Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, the lead singer of   the Tuareg rock band Tinariwen, at his home near Tessalit in northern Mali.

We had just come from spending days in the Sahara with Tuareg   rebels fighting the Mali state and there was a sand storm brewing. We wanted   to stop somewhere and thought it would be interesting to know Ibrahim’s   opinion of the rebellion.

As we took shelter in a small hut from the roaring wind,   Ibrahim shared his powerful personal story — one that will be familiar to all   fans of Tinariwen.

Many of the fighters had lost one or both parents as children,   to undiagnosed illnesses due to malnutrition and lack of medical care. Some   had lost a parent to war. And every one of the men had tried his hand at both   armed rebellion against his government, and emigration to Libya in search of   work – the two options many Tuareg see available to them to improve   conditions for their families and their people.

Many ended up entrapped as mercenaries for Gaddafi during the   recent Libya war. They cried as they talked about the death of their   relatives and friends in NATO bombings, and the immense pressure they feel to   provide for their families – loved ones who they see deteriorating before   their eyes in the harsh conditions of the desert.

One of our subjects died during the course of filming, leaving   behind three orphans. Most of these stories remain on the cutting room floor   because there is barely time, even in three hours, to cover the essential   ground on this complex story.

We realised that Ibrahim Ag Alhabib’s story has not lost its   relevance. New generations of Tuaregs from northern Niger and northern Mali   are simply living a modified version of the same old cyclical story of the   Tuareg people: rebellion, exile, return, rebellion, exile, return …

The reason for the stubborn resilience of this pattern is that   the conditions which give rise to Tuareg rebellion have essentially not   changed.

The Sahara

It is something I found myself wondering more than once during   the nights we spent sleeping in freezing cold deserts, living the same way   our Tuareg hosts do every day. Even the physical stamina required to live in   a tent in the Sahara is incredible and always reminds you of your   vulnerability and mortality. Just a few weeks of the constant exposure to   sand, wind, heat and cold debilitated me to a point of exhaustion it took   months to recover from.

On the other hand, far from being merely harsh and empty, the   Sahara is a soulful place, embracing you with its solitude and beauty, its   open space, and the company of gentle living things. Even the deepest parts   of the desert are not dead, but filled with animals, people, culture, and   history. All the feelings of being there – from sublime comfort and peace to   terror and loneliness – are satisfying in their truth and draw you back to   the desert, in spite of its hardship.

The Sahara enriches and impoverishes the Tuareg. It is their   mother and source, but also their destroyer and grave.

Parts of this trilogy were filmed in the Sahara proper, and   others in cities and deserts of the Sahel, the belt of scrub that lies to the   immediate south of the Sahara. But wherever we found Tuaregs, even if they   were knee deep in yellowing pasture, or standing on a busy city street, they   always referred to their land as “the Sahara”.

“To us the Sahara means our origins,” said Ibrahim.   “We are people who live in the Sahara, journeying in the Sahara. It   represents our real nation.” Orphans of the Sahara can be seen each     week from January 9, 2014, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000;     Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200;     Wednesday: 0100

The physical conditions of Tuareg existence in the Sahara have   hardly changed in decades. Even now, sleeping in the Sahara is like lying   alone on a boat in the middle of a vast ocean.

You are lying in the sand at 2am when suddenly a primordial wind   howls up from infinite corridors of emptiness and time – terrifying in its   loneliness, as awesome as the stars in the night sky – to confront you with   the essential fact that you are alone in the universe, and everyone you have   ever loved will die.

If the Sahara can inspire that terrible feeling of cosmic   loneliness in an adult, what would it feel like to be a child in this   environment who had actually lost their parents?

Orphans of the Sahara: Return

With the fall of Gaddafi, thousands of Tuaregs return to Mali and Niger and launch their fight for an independent state. ( 09-Jan-2014 )

Images – For Demonstration Purposes Only! Narrations Below

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The Tuareg are the indigenous people of the Sahara, the world’s largest desert

They are divided by colonial history between Mali and Algeria, Libya, Niger and Burkina Faso

The Tuareg of the Sahara are among the poorest and most isolated people in the world

The Tuareg are the indigenous people of the Sahara desert.

They are one of the poorest and most isolated peoples in the world – and one of the most militarised.

They are an army of the poor in a land of astounding natural wealth; an animal-herding people in a dying world of drought.

For decades, many Tuareg men have left their homes in search of work in neighbouring countries. Thousands ended up in Libya, as workers and fighters, and many as mercenaries for slain Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

In late 2011, after Gaddafi’s death, thousands of them returned to their Saharan homeland in Niger and Mali.

But having lost access to the country that was their only source of livelihood, they came home to find little more than crushing poverty, hunger and drought.

Barely able to feed their children amidst total state neglect, the men launched a rebellion to found their own country – for which they had already chosen a flag and an old Tuareg name: Azawad.

But the Tuaregs would not be the only ones to emerge from a collapsing Libya with a lot of guns, and a plan. Al-Qaeda was also preparing for a fight

The Palestinian Catastrophe – 65 years on! Reply

Al – Nakba – The Palestinian Catastrophe

Al Jazeera Television

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/specialseries/2013/05/20135612348774619.html

A series on the Palestinian ‘catastrophe’ of 1948 that led to dispossession and a conflict that endures to this day.

Last Modified: 08 May 2013 10:15

 The Video – Part 1

www.bcove.me/jvdvl0rb  

“The Nakba did not begin in 1948. Its origins lie over two centuries ago….”

So begins this four-part series on the ‘Nakba’, meaning the ‘Catastrophe’, about the history of the Palestinian exodus that led to the first Arab-Israeli War in 1948 and the establishment of the state of Israel.

This sweeping history starts back in 1799 with Napoleon’s attempted advance into Palestine to check British expansion and his appeal to the Jews of the world to reclaim their land in league with France.

 The narrative moves through the 19th century and into the 20th century with the British Mandate in Palestine and comes right up to date in the 21st century and the ongoing ‘Nakba’ on the ground

Arab, Israeli and Western intellectuals, historians and eye-witnesses provide the central narrative which is accompanied by archive material and documents, many only recently released for the first time.

Editor’s note: Since first running on Al Jazeera Arabic in 2008, this series has won Arab and international awards and has been well received at festivals throughout the world

For the Palestinians, 1948 marks the ‘Nakba’ or the ‘catastrophe’, when hundreds of thousands were forced out of their homes.

But for Israelis, the same year marks the creation of their own state.

The tragedy in Palestine is not just a local one; it is a tragedy for the world, because it is an injustice that is a menace to the world’s peace.

Arnold Toynbee, British historian.

This series attempts to present an understanding of the events of the past that are still shaping the present.

This story starts in 1799, outside the walls of Acre in Ottoman-controlled Palestine, when an army under Napoleon Bonaparte besieged the city. It was all part of a campaign to defeat the Ottomans and establish a French presence in the region.

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In search of allies, Napoleon issued a letter offering Palestine as a homeland to the Jews under French protection. He called on the Jews to ‘rise up’ against what he called their oppressors.

Napoleon’s appeal was widely publicised. But he was ultimately defeated. In Acre today, the only memory of him is a statue atop a hill overlooking the city.

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Yet Napoleon’s project for a Jewish homeland in the region under a colonial protectorate did not die, 40 years later, the plan was revived but by the British.

The tragedy in Palestine is not just a local one; it is a tragedy for the world, because it is an injustice that is a menace to the world’s peace.

Arnold Toynbee, British historian.

Al Nakba can be seen each week at the following GMT: Tuesday 2000; Friday 0600; Saturday 2000; Sunday 1200

Editor’s note: The Al-Nakba debate on 4th June 2013 – Al Jazeera’s Marwan Bishara brings together different perspectives to debate the series and the ongoing relevance of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

See also Witness: The Great Book Robbery

Images The Naqba Nakba – The Disaster Castasrophy – The Calamity – For Demonstration Purposes Only!

The World needs to be reminded 65 years on – injustices heaped on innocent people by those that call themselves as ‘civilised good observing Christian’ peoples – and others – and to the Arab Leaders looking the other way – and now caught up by events – years later!

Like I always say – there can be NO PEACE NO SECURITY in the world till The Palestinian issue is solved!

Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

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Please watch Jazeera TV – it will make you cry – even if you are not Arab, Palestinian, Muslim and Christian!!!

 

The Sir Robert Frost and Bishop Desmond Tutu Interview! Reply

 

The Sir Robert Frost and Bishop Desmond Tutu Interview!

Not Going Quietly!

A Lesson To Learn For Israel – and Others To Revisit!

Please Reread The History Books!!

The Frost Interview

Desmond Tutu: Not going quietly

The Nobel laureate on his role in South Africa’s struggle against apartheid and his alarm over recent developments.

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/frostinterview/2012/11/20121112125225355813.html

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the famous Nobel Peace laureate, and one of the world’s most respected church leaders, was a central figure in ensuring an end to white minority rule in South Africa.

He was instrumental in the struggle against apartheid, also acting as chairman of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). He has since gone on to play a role as one of Nelson Mandela’s handpicked ‘Elders’ along with others like former US President Jimmy Carter.

The archbishop takes Sir David Frost on a tour of his beloved South Africa; he talks about his time in the anti-apartheid struggle movement, his work with the TRC, and his alarm over recent developments in the “rainbow nation”.

As a defiant campaigner against apartheid, Tutu is one of the world’s most prominent defenders of human rights.

Growing up in a racially divided state he tells Sir David how hard it was to explain South African politics to his children:

“We’d just come back from England with our youngest child. The youngest was born in London and she saw some children playing on swings and she said, ‘I want to go and play’ and, we had to say, ‘No sweetheart, you can’t’.

“And she said, ‘But there all the children playing’, and it was incredibly difficult. It really just made you feel, ‘I wish the ground could open and swallow me up’. How do I tell my child that, yes you are a child, but you’re not a child like those other children who are on the swings?”

The archbishop recalls how the injustices he saw under apartheid tested his Christian faith:

“I really got very angry with God, and would rail at God and say: For goodness sake, how can you allow such and such to happen?”

But he later says: “Someone up there must really have been on our side or batting for us …. After [Nelson Mandela’s] release and the build-up to our first democratic election, it was one of the roughest, one of the bloodiest, periods in our history.”

Tutu hails Mandela as an “incredible guy!” – after all Mandela was a prominent participant in the negotiations that led to South Africa’s peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy.

“His contribution is immeasurable; his stature,” says Tutu. “I mean for someone who was the commander-in-chief of the military wing of the ANC to be at the forefront of persuading people that it would be better for us to negotiate; it is better for us to lay down our arms. And then to try to live that.”

Moving forward, Tutu expresses his concerns about the direction the current government in South Africa is headed. He has also become more outspoken about his criticism of the ruling party, and the rainbow nation, of what he was once so proud.

“We are a wounded people” Tutu says, recalling the painful testimonies he heard as chairman of the TRC hearings.

The Frost Interview can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2000; Saturday: 1200; Sunday: 0100; Monday: 0600.

REMARKS

  • Asking God – How can you allow such things and injustices to happen (in Apartheid South Africa then!)
  • His home was destroyed by the Apartheid Regime because of his stand!
  • “We will not buckle under their system” – he said
  • The Apartheid Regime behaved exactly the same as Zionist Israel (Benjamin Netanyahu) is behaving now!
  • That they were always right, correct, ethical and perfect – others not and inferior peoples and race – and one can do what they wanted with them!
  • History is on the side of The Arabs and The Palestinians – and time and history will prove that to be correct!
  • They will win one day!
  • Anyway The Arab World has now changed – not what it was before The Arab Spring!
  • Biggest casualty is The Truth!
  • And future relations between Nations – starting with our current Youth!
  • They will not forget – They will remember!
  • We pray for sanity, reason, pragmatism and sense and responsibilities!
  • People are already tired with costs and hardships of living – we see demonstrations and protests all over the world now – even in Western Europe and even Israel – and USA too!
  • People should learn to live together in this globe in peace, harmony, tolerance, patience and understanding – Live and Let Live!
  • We owe it to our future – history – legacy – destiny and future!
  • One should not make a bad state of affairs turn even more nasty and worse! Applies to ALL!
  • God CURSE those that use babies, children and women killed and maimed as Collateral Damage!
  • May The Butcher Israeli Leaders join Hitler in Hell AMEN AMIN