Most Racist Countries of the World! Reply

 

‘Most Racist’ countries  of the World!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html#ixzz2Tf1KMtEC

Washington Post: A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries

Map shows world’s ‘Most Racist’ countries

(and the answers may surprise you!)

  • *** Hong Kong, Bangladesh, Jordan and India named least tolerant countries
  • U.S., Britain, Canada and South America are among the least racist
  • Survey asks people if they would want neighbours of a different race

By Hugo Gye

17 May 2013

Britain is one of the most racially tolerant countries on the planet, a survey claims.

The global social attitudes study claims that the most racially intolerant populations are all in the developing world, with Bangladesh, Jordan and India in the top five.

By contrast, the study of 80 countries over three decades found Western countries were most accepting of other cultures with Britain, the U.S., Canada and Australia more tolerant than anywhere else.

Map

 

Racism: This map shows the nations of the world where people have the most and least tolerant attitudes

The data came from the World Value Survey, which measured the social attitudes of people in different countries, as reported by the Washington Post.

The survey asked individuals what types of people they would refuse to live next to, and counted how many chose the option ‘people of a different race’ as a percentage for each country.

More…

Researchers have suggested that societies where more people do not want neighbours from other races can be considered less racially tolerant.

The country with the highest proportion of ‘intolerant’ people who wanted neighbours similar to them was Hong Kong, where 71.8 per cent of the population would refuse to live next to someone of a different race.

Next were Bangladesh on 71.7 per cent, Jordan on 51.4 per cent and India with 43.5 per cent.

 

Hongkong

Intolerant: A survey found that Hong Kong had the most people professing racist views of any country

Racist views are strikingly rare in the U.S., according to the survey, which claims that only 3.8 per cent of residents are reluctant to have a neighbour of another race.

Other English-speaking countries once part of the British Empire shared the same tolerant attitude – fewer than five per cent of Britons, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders showed signs of racism.

People in the UK are also tolerant of other differences such as speaking a foreign language or practising an alternative religion – for example, fewer than two per cent of Britons would object to having neighbours of a different faith to them.

Similarly, fewer than one in 20 people in most South American countries admitted harbouring prejudice against other races.

 New York

Diverse: The multicultural U.S. is among the least racially intolerant countries, according to the data

The Middle East, which is currently dealing with large numbers of low-skilled immigrants from south Asia, seems to be a hotbed of racial tension, however.

Europe is remarkably split – the west of the continent is generally more tolerant than the east, but France is a striking outlier with 22.7 per cent of the French rejecting neighbourhood diversity.

Some have pointed out problems in the survey data, claiming that because the polls span a long period of time they are an unreliable guide to current attitudes.

However, a more serious flaw could be the fact that in most Western countries racism is so taboo than many people will hide their intolerant views and lie to the questioners.

Max Fisher of the Washington Post suggested that maybe ‘Americans are conditioned by their education and media to keep these sorts of racial preferences private, i.e. to lie about them on surveys, in a way that Indians might not be’.

THE LEAST RACIALLY TOLERANT COUNTRIES

40%+ (of individuals surveyed would not want a person of another race as a neighbour)
India, Jordan, Bangladesh, Hong Kong

30 – 39.9%
Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Vietnam, Indonesia, South Korea

20 – 39.9%
France, Turkey, Bulgaria, Algeria, Morocco, Mali, Zambia, Thailand, Malaysia, The Philippines

THE MOST TOLERANT COUNTRIES

0 to 4.9%
United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Guatemala, Britain, Sweden, Norway, Latvia, Australia, New Zealand

5 – 9.9%
Chile, Peru, Mexico, Spain, Germany, Belgium, Belarus, Croatia, Japan, Pakistan, South Africa

10 – 14.9%
Finland, Poland, Ukraine, Italy, Greece, Czech Republic, Slovakia

15 – 19.9%
Venezuela, Hungary, Serbia, Romania, Macedonia, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Russia, China

Source: World Values Survey

Read more:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2325502/Map-shows-worlds-racist-countries-answers-surprise-you.html#ixzz2Tf1KMtEC

*** My Comments

My Book Psychology of Arab Management Thinking! about my experiences with one such company from there says a lot of things here!

My Books here – www.myown-ebooks.com and www.myownmajid.com

The Author – Majid Al Suleimany

Appro JRD Tata by Sudha Murthy 2

 

August 2004

APPRO JRD – Sudha Murty

 

Image JRD Tata

Sudha Murthy* was livid when a job advertisement posted by a Tata company at the institution where she was completing her post graduation stated that ‘lady candidates need not apply’. She dashed off a ‘postcard’ to JRD, protesting against the discrimination. It was the beginning of an association that would change her life in more ways than one

There are two photographs that hang on my office wall. Every day when I enter my office I look at them before starting my day. They are pictures of two old people, one of a gentleman in a blue suit and the other a black-and-white image of a man with dreamy eyes and a white beard.

People have asked me if the people in the photographs are related to me. Some have even asked me, “Is this black-and-white photo that of a Sufi saint or a religious guru?” I smile and reply “No, nor are they related to me. These people made an impact on my life. I am grateful to them.” “Who are they?” “The man in the blue suit is Bharat Ratna JRD Tata and the black-and-white photo is of Jamsetji Tata.” “But why do you have them in your office?” “You can call it gratitude.”

Then, invariably, I have to tell the person the following story.

It was a long time ago. I was young and bright, bold and idealistic. I was in the final year of my master’s course in computer science at the Indian Institute of Science [IISc] in Bangalore, then known as the Tata Institute. Life was full of fun and joy. I did not know what helplessness or injustice meant.

It was probably the April of 1974. Bangalore was getting warm and red gulmohars were blooming at the IISc campus. I was the only girl in my postgraduate department and was staying at the ladies hostel. Other girls were pursuing research in different departments of science. I was looking forward to going abroad to complete a doctorate in computer science. I had been offered scholarships from universities in US. I had not thought of taking up a job in India.

One day, while on the way to my hostel from our lecture-hall complex, I saw an advertisement on the notice board. It was a standard job-requirement notice from the famous automobile company Telco [now Tata Motors]. It stated that the company required young, bright engineers, hardworking and with an excellent academic background, etc.

At the bottom was a small line: “Lady candidates need not apply.” I read it and was very upset. For the first time in my life I was up against gender discrimination.

Though I was not keen on taking up a job, I saw this as a challenge. I had done extremely well in academics, better than most of my male peers. Little did I know then that in real life academic excellence is not enough to be successful.

Images Sudha Murthy – Then and Now!

Returning to my  room. I decided to inform the topmost person in Telco’s management about the injustice the company was perpetrating. I got a postcard and started to write, but there was a problem: I did not know who headed Telco. I thought it must be one of the Tatas. I knew JRD Tata was the head of the Tata Group; I had seen his pictures in newspapers (actually, Sumant Moolgaokar was the company’s chairman then).

I took the card, addressed it to JRD and started writing. To this day I remember clearly what I wrote. “The great Tatas have always been pioneers. They are the people who started the basic infrastructure industries in India, such as iron and steel, chemicals, textiles and locomotives. They have cared for higher education in India since 1900 and they were responsible for the establishment of the Indian Institute of Science. Fortunately, I study there. But I am surprised how a company such as Telco is discriminating on the basis of gender.”

I posted the letter and forgot about it. Less than 10 days later, I received a telegram stating that I had to appear for an interview at Telco’s Pune facility at the company’s expense.

I was taken aback by the telegram. My hostel mates told me I should use the opportunity to go to Pune free of cost — and buy them the famous Pune saris for cheap! I collected Rs 30 each from everyone who wanted a sari. When I look back, I feel like laughing at the reasons for my going, but back then they seemed good enough to make the trip.

It was my first visit to Pune and I immediately fell in love with the city. To this day it remains dear to me. I feel as much at home in Pune as I do in Hubli, my hometown. The place changed my life in so many ways.

As directed, I went to Telco’s Pimpri office for the interview. There were six people on the panel and I realised then that this was serious business. “This is the girl who wrote to JRD,” I heard somebody whisper as soon as I entered the room. By then I knew for sure that I would not get the job. That realisation abolished all fears from my mind, so I was rather cool while the interview was being conducted.

Even before the interview started, I reckoned the panel was biased, so I told them, rather impolitely, “I hope this is only a technical interview.” They were taken aback by my rudeness, and even today I am ashamed about my attitude.

The panel asked me technical questions and I answered all of them. Then an elderly gentleman with an affectionate voice told me, “Do you know why we said lady candidates need not apply? The reason is that we have never employed any ladies on the shop floor. This is not a co-ed college; this is a factory. When it comes to academics, you are a first ranker throughout. We appreciate that, but people like you should work in research laboratories.”

I was a young girl from small-town Hubli. My world had been a limited place. I did not know the ways of large corporate houses and their difficulties, so I answered, “But you must start somewhere, otherwise no woman will ever be able to work in your factories.”

Finally, after a long interview, I was told I had been successful. So this was what the future had in store for me. Never had I thought I would take up a job in Pune. That city changed my life in many ways. I met a shy young man from Karnataka there, we became good friends and we got married.

It was only after joining Telco that I realised who JRD was: the uncrowned king of Indian industry. Now I was scared, but I did not get to meet him till I was transferred to Bombay. One day I had to show some reports to Mr Moolgaokar, our chairman, who we all knew as SM. I was in his office on the first floor of Bombay House [the Tata headquarters] when, suddenly, JRD walked in. That was the first time I saw ‘appro JRD’. Appro means ‘our’ in Gujarati. That was the affectionate term by which people at Bombay House called him.

I was feeling very nervous, remembering my postcard episode. SM introduced me nicely, “Jeh (that’s what his close associates called him), this young woman is an engineer and that too a postgraduate. She is the first woman to work on the Telco shop floor.” JRD looked at me. I was praying he would not ask me any questions about my interview (or the postcard that preceded it). Thankfully, he didn’t. Instead he remarked. “It is nice that girls are getting into engineering in our country. By the way, what is your name?” “When I joined Telco I was Sudha Kulkarni, Sir,” I replied. “Now I am Sudha Murty.” He smiled that kindly smile and started a discussion with SM. As for me, I almost ran out of the room.

After that I used to see JRD on and off. He was the Tata Group chairman and I was merely an engineer. There was nothing that we had in common. I was in awe of him.

One day I was waiting for Murthy, my husband, to pick me up after office hours. To my surprise I saw JRD standing next to me. I did not know how to react. Yet again I started worrying about that postcard. Looking back, I realise JRD had forgotten about it. It must have been a small incident for him, but not so for me.

“Young lady, why are you here?” he asked. “Office time is over.” I said, “Sir, I’m waiting for my husband to come and pick me up.” JRD said, “It is getting dark and there’s no one in the corridor. I’ll wait with you till your husband comes.” I was quite used to waiting for Murthy, but having JRD waiting alongside made me extremely uncomfortable.

I was nervous. Out of the corner of my eye I looked at him. He wore a simple white pant and shirt. He was old, yet his face was glowing. There wasn’t any air of superiority about him. I was thinking, “Look at this person. He is a chairman, a well-respected man in our country and he is waiting for the sake of an ordinary employee.”

Then I saw Murthy and I rushed out. JRD called and said, “Young lady, tell your husband never to make his wife wait again.”

In 1982 I had to resign from my job at Telco. I was reluctant to go, but I really did not have a choice. I was coming down the steps of Bombay House after wrapping up my final settlement when I saw JRD coming up. He was absorbed in thought. I wanted to say goodbye to him so I stopped. He saw me and paused.

Gently, he said, “So what are you doing, Mrs Kulkarni? (That was the way he always addressed me.) “Sir, I am leaving Telco.” “Where are you going?” he asked. “Pune, sir. My husband is starting a company called Infosys and I’m shifting to Pune.” “Oh! And what you will do when you are successful?” “Sir, I don’t know whether we will be successful.” “Never start with diffidence,” he advised me. “Always start with confidence. When you are successful you must give back to society. Society gives us so much; we must reciprocate. I wish you all the best.”

Then JRD continued walking up the stairs. I stood there for what seemed like a millennium. That was the last time I saw him alive.

Many years later I met Ratan Tata in the same Bombay office, occupying the chair JRD once did. I told him of my many sweet memories of working with Telco. Later, he wrote to me, “It was nice listening about Jeh from you. The sad part is that he’s not alive to see you today.”

I consider JRD a great man because, despite being an extremely busy person, he valued one postcard written by a young girl seeking justice. He must have received thousands of letters every day. He could have thrown mine away, but he didn’t do that. He respected the intentions of that unknown girl, who had neither influence nor money, and gave her an opportunity in his company. He did not merely give her a job; he changed her life and mindset forever.

Close to 50 per cent of the students in today’s engineering colleges are girls. And there are women on the shop floor in many industry segments. I see these changes and I think of JRD. If at all time stops and asks me what I want from life, I would say I wish JRD were alive today to see how the company we started has grown. He would have enjoyed it wholeheartedly.

My love and respect for the House of Tatas remains undiminished by the passage of time. I always looked up to JRD. I saw him as a role model – for his simplicity, his generosity, his kindness and the care he took of his employees. Those blue eyes always reminded me of the sky; they had the same vastness and munificence.

* Sudha Murthy is the chairperson of the Infosys Foundation. She is involved in a number of social development initiatives and is also a widely published writer.

May some of our big Influential Rich Powerful in Oman read this – and we all learn from this!

Best Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

Living Together As One In Peace and Harmony! By Majid Al Suleimany Reply

For Sunday July 29th 2012

My Website – www.majidall.com

Between Us Only!

Ethnic and Sectarian Violence!

Living Together As One In Peace and Harmony!

  • The world suffers now not because of evil people– but because of good people that have decided to remain silent – Albert Einstein
  • All actions are judged by the motive prompting themThe Islamic Sayings – The Hadith
  • The search for someone to blame is always successful! – Robert Half

I was watching this Al Jazeera TV interview where the Bangladeshi President was being queried as to why they were sending back the Rohingyas – and her replying that her country was already full of Refugees – and they did not have space for anymore – and that it was not ‘her country’s problems’!

Images Assam India Violence

It is with a heavy heart, great sorrow and sadness to note the new ‘in-thing’ of ethnic and sectarian violence – that is now springing up in some parts of the world! I say with sadness and sorrow because most of these peoples affected are just themselves, gullible, unsuspecting poor naïve people – being used and utilized by others so-called ‘politicians and leaders’ of all sorts – for their own hidden agendas, manifest and innuendos!

What makes it more sad, tragic and pathetic is that the people involved in these violence are themselves always poor, needy and desperate lots – but are being used as targets and pawns of the ‘mischief and trouble-makers’ at the top. They are used like ‘dummies-puppets-on-strings’ by their controllers and their manipulators cum designers.

Images Rohingyas Burma Violence

That these things can happen in this Muslim Holy Fasting month makes it all the more sadder and more tragic. Not that we have enough in defined within borders of people still rising in the Arab Spring – like now in Syria and others – and or in another countries struck by economic strangulation and woes – but now within countries like in Myannamar (Burma), India, Nigeria, Iraq, Pakistan – and several others too!

Some Quotes on Mob Violence:-

  • Victory attained by violence is tantamount to a defeat, for it is momentary – Gandhi
  • Force is all-conquering, but its victories are short-lived – Abraham Lincoln
  • The man who strikes first admits that his ideas have given out – Chinese Proverb
  • What broke in a man when he could bring himself to kill another? – Alan Paton
  • Who overcomes by force hath overcome but half his foe – John Milton

The REAL Religiouspeople and Scholars at least – if not the Politicians – are expected and required to do much more than just disinterests and apathy – or even as is being suggested in some places – that they are even led – either directly or on the sidelines – by the so-called ‘Religious cum Political Leaders’ too!

The Secular, The Professionals, The Intellectuals, NGOs, the People outside their own countries – should indeed speak out! Now before everyone become the Losers!

And all these mob, sectarian and ethnic violence? For what? And for what reason and purpose? For what purpose, will and intention? What is there to be gained by using such poor innocent naïve trusting people for these whimsical, crude, unethical and unprincipled – hidden or even wide open agendas?

.Not only they are discrediting themselves, their ethnic groupings – but even the society and the nations that they represent – or supposed to represent. One of the signs that are said of the ‘end of the world’ is that when you hear somebody has died – you in turn feel jealous and envious – that it was not you that had died! I can associate this feeling and inclination – seeing how bad things have become now in the world – all the doom, despair, decadence, malaise and disasters that we are facing now!

To the extent that one just starts to think loud – in shock and awe – what job and responsibilities that are awaiting for our Great Prophet Jesus Christ – Nabih Issa – on his coming to save the world for ourselves – and from ourselves – seeing all that is going around now. I am convinced that all the Great Prophets are turning in their graves now – seeing all that is going on now.

Believe me – even that what you would call as ‘nature worshippers’ of trees, rivers, sun, moon – and whatever you may have – have the same outlook, focus, will and intentions – that human beings should live together ‘as one’ in peace and harmony. They even believe in preserving nature as it is – and that even for example – not to to disturb migratory ants on the ground – giving them wide space and non-interference to do their bit! They can easily shame and disgrace us by these outlooks and practices.

There are some tribes in deep Africa that I know that do not hunt animals – because they feel they are to share the world with them – but eat only wild fruits and berries – or in the worst case scenarios – would eat only those wild animals that have died – if they must eat to survive – and live on!

Yet if you go and ask them if it is all right to go to your neighbour’s house or village – and kill them for no other reason but based on ethnicities – and so-called Religions – they will consider you dangerous, as mental and psychologically unbalanced – and people need to be protected around you and that you will interact – and interface with.

A long time ago in that distant land this type of believer told me to move my feet – because I was trampling on some black ants! It shocked me to smithereens – and here I was thinking in my mind and heart – that I was ‘better than this so-called Big Baobab tree believer!

The people who are suffering are themselves – the needy, hungry and desperate themselves. One such poor person going out to cause maximum harm, damage, maiming and killing of another himself of the same lots and in suffering – in mob violence – and xenophobic rampage and violence – tinted with so-called religious and ethnicity divide and polarisation.

It is a bloody shame to the so-called Religious and National Leaders to allow such things to happen – and continue to happen in their countries – especially to those that are quick to come out to blame the others as the cause of the violence – with their hidden agendas, manifest and focuses.

A Great Wise Arab Leader had said – The friends of today can be the enemies of tomorrow – and the enemies of today can be the friends of tomorrow! I think it is high time that we Arabs and Muslims prioratised and analysed in truth, sincerity and in being genuine and truthful – that are now our REAL friends and those that are not – and we do our duties, responsibly and what is required for us to do – for our future, history, legacy and destiny – and remembering all the recent events happening all around us now – before it is too late for everyone.

May Allah God Protect and Preserve us all – May The Good Lord Direct and Show us the Right Ways and Path – Amin Amen

Take Care!

By:

Majid Al Suleimany