It Is So Sad – The Nemesis! Reply

Between Us Only!

The Nemesis!

These two weeks there were these news – apart from the usual ones in the Arab World of Egypt and Syria as main – of the death of Jacintha Saldanha – the Indian nurse subject of a prank Australian Radio Show by two Greig and Christian.

The other was the massacre of 20 lost-lives innocent children below the age of 10 by one crazed Adam Lanza. This happened in Sandy Hawk Elementary School in Newtown – Connecticut. At one time Newtown was considered as the 5th most peaceful state in USA! Even the USA President Barack Hussein Obama was emotional close to tears in his speech!

This week I was also very much disturbed, annoyed and perturbed by the USA Publishing Company not publishing my books – already paid for in full – because of the question of Images – though I had explained clearly to their Vice President Operations Lady with a signed document explaining the sources of my images. The books were fully paid for since July 2012 – but it has dragged on to date – one excuse after the other – in the end to decide either they publish my books – or refund me in full.

It should be stressed that they had published my earlier books – including The Arab Management books – please see www.myown-ebooks.com. I guess they are reluctant to publish the books is because of the articles inside the book – Between Us Only! Series – and some of the subjects could be sensitive to them – or they are just being protective of their own kind. Some of the subjects?

  • Rising Islamophobia – Live and Let Live!
  • The Arabs Will Never Learn!
  • No More Wars – Please!
  • Stop The Gaza Blockade!
  • The Jewish Diaspora!
  • We Need To Speak Out!
  • You Reap What You Sow!
  • A Question of Loyalty!
  • What Goes Around; Comes Around!

That is the only reason I can gather for their reluctance is for the above. Depending on how much they will refund – or change their minds in publishing the books – further action will depend on all the above only!

And of course, denying the voice to the other side. Being a Muslim and an Arab. That is how bad things are now in USA – they have lost their self respects and conscience – lost the old USA that protected the rights and freedom of others! Great shame!

One of the books was on Road Safety – the Novel type – carrying real true stories of Accident victims and their impact on their lives now – and with the increasing road accidents and fatalities especially in Oman GCC now! How can one even stop this book to be published? It smacks of open hatred, animosity – and racialism only!

Anyway, I was keen to write more on the poor massacred children – as children are children – devoid of race, creed, colour or nationality. We have seen poor Gazan children massacred in their homes by Israeli bombardments and air force strikes – just as we have seen so many others ‘collateral damages’ in other parts of the world!

I have also read about this visit from The USA Assistant Secretary of State – Beth Jones – with the title Oman a partner in global fight against terror and the very nice words she had to say about Oman in general!

Being that upset and annoyed – I will concentrate for today on the death of poor Nurse Jacintha Saldanha – with due respects and apologies here!

***

In my career life, I have worked with many Western bosses and peers. I always made a point that as soon as the main meal is served (and sweets!) – I make it a point to leave as soon as I can – especially when it is not only me from the family at the party – because this is usually followed by teases, jokes and pranks – some to unimaginable and intrusive personal levels! Of course the usual excuse is the free drinks being served!

To the extent that the next day they would come in – a bit better off – but still not sober – to apologise – if I had upset and or annoyed you in any way in that party! The people that usually get a special battering and treatment are those like us that are teetotalers – and not smokers!

Of course the belief was also – if you joined the fun and melee – the more chances were there for your promotion and advancement! And if you cannot beat them – join them syndromes! And if you have a Porsche, Mercedes or BMW as your car fancy – and or can play golf – the better still!

With due respects here! Not all of them were like that – there were many also that respected and esteemed local customs, traditions, heritage and culture. In one of the incidents that I will never ever forget in my life was this top CEO in the International Company who did not take offence – but actually joined in – when one of the senior Omanis (by age that is!) started using his hands to eat with us at the table!

I was trying to tactfully counsel him to use the spoon at least – but the good man got what I was trying to say – and told me – ‘let him enjoy his meal – you know what – I will join in! And though in the end the man came a hero – and a very wise leader – and not only as a the usual manager – that is asked to come in and intervene – but ends up supporting his own staff – and against a customer! Because the customer is an outsider!

Now you may well be asking me why I take the long road to come to the point – and what has Company parties have got to do with the earlier part of my column? If you know me – and the way I write – and straight from the hip – or the heart – depending on whom I am addressing here! With tongue in cheek speaking!

Do not forget I am a very angry and pissed off person still. People do not realise how attached we Writers are to our works – and how a Writer feels when his (her) books are marginalised and sidelined – and how traumatic, painful and emotional that can be! So please bear with me!

The point I want to make is that there are some people that always feel they can do whatever they want to do with others – and they are self-appointed on higher levels and echelons. This goes across the divide between locals and expatriates – guests and the invited – to the hosts too!

True we all enjoy fun, mirth and humour – which human being does not – in the real sense of the word? But sometimes doing pranks against or at the expense of others can be tolerated if one comes out finally and apologises it was a joke, tease and prank – immediately after – and not let the person feel so small and insignificant – so belittled and so insulted – that the poor person even decides to end his or her life – by committing suicide!

I must also admit and say this thing too – because we do not know how long we shall live in this world. Yesterday my cousin of 30 years old had died in Tanzania – after only a cold and flu! He did not recover – got high temperature – his treatment was bungled – and soon went into a coma – and death!

I must admit I have had many differences with peoples – sometimes I become very emotional and upset – and the worst thing I do is put my feelings on paper – and for some not open and objective people – that is like pouring fuel over fire – because they simply will not take that in! But find me a perfect person in this world – I would like to meet him (or her!) – And you too!

Only Our Lord and Our Creator is Perfect – no one else is!

Take Care!

By Majid Al Suleimany

P.S. I am not going to put any images today – that is how upset I am today

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I am now Quitting! Reply

Majid Al SuleimanyTime To Quit Is Now!

Giving Up – Now!

  • · Writing is the only profession where no one considers you ridiculous if you earn no money – Jules Renard

I must admit that I am a sick person suffering from being an acute diabetic case and with eyes problems – cataract and glaucoma too. I also suffer from complications of so many other cases.

I had tried hard to send my books as gifts and compliments to Top VIPs and High Profile peoples – and hardly any thanks – with the exception of a few expatriate CEOs only.

Despite designing a Road Safety Website – www.bethesafedriver.com and writing a book on Road Safety Novel Type based on true life stories for others to know and learn from – nothing much has changed in being recognised and in acceptance!

Despite two Arab Management books – Psychology of Arab Management Thinking! And A Cry For Help! – even if you go to books worldwide you will find them being shown – at home nothing has changed much!

Only peoples’ concentrations are what I write in my columns – and why people would still prefer for the dirt to be pushed under the carpet – and me to shut up my mouth – not to open it – and speak!

So today – Saturday – December 8th 2012 – I am – finally – Giving Up!

We have all seen these Great Bands that had made to the top – and stayed there for quite awhile – and then they decided to disband! We have seen similar about dramas and soap operas – like Friends, Seinfield etc doing the same. Even stars like Oprah Winfrey etc.

The reason they give is the same. When you are on top – that is the time to quit – not earlier – not later! Quit whilst you have still made it – and quit where there is still some head room!

As fans that know me well I stumbled into writing more as a hobby and passion. I had never ever planned and or imagined to make a career in it. And a person who wants to make a career in writing should well know – do not depend on it for a living – otherwise you will starve to death. The story of Moawiyya Nur – the sad tragic Sudanese boy (journalist) who starved to death in trying to make a career in writing in downturn Cairo in the 1950s will well confirm and authencicate!

If I had been successful in my consultancy business and or in my career – it is most likely that I would not have gone into writing.

Today I have published 8 books – all the details are in my websites – www.myown-ebooks.com and www.majidbooks.com and www.bethesafedriver.com

2 books are in Arab Management – 1 Road Safety – and 5 in my column writings The Oman Daily Observer – Between Us Only! – At My Workplace! And Society Speaks! (KOM).

Lately I have felt strong vibes and feelings to quit. I feel it in me to stop writing. Besides saying all that I had wanted to say – nobody cares or feels what I write or say. I am just banging my head against brick walls – getting it swollen and red – and bleeding too.

Nobody appreciates or recognises what I do – anyway! Wasted time, efforts and energies – and just wasted loyalties and feelings too.

I am also not happy how my columns are being treated. Sometimes I am told we did not receive it – though copied to my addresses (and others) confirm as received. I do not know which are my days anymore.

It was supposed to be every Sunday and Wednesdays – but now are so irregular that I am myself confused!

There is an East African saying that goes like this – one does not have to tell you to go if you are a guest – the telltale signals are enough for you to know it is time that you left! Leave yourself!

I really had tried… hard!

Wishing you all the very best – and with sincere and genuine apologies –

Citizen – Majid bin Said bin Nasser Al Suleimany

Appro JRD Tata by Sudha Murthy 2

 

August 2004

APPRO JRD – Sudha Murty

 

Image JRD Tata

Sudha Murthy* was livid when a job advertisement posted by a Tata company at the institution where she was completing her post graduation stated that ‘lady candidates need not apply’. She dashed off a ‘postcard’ to JRD, protesting against the discrimination. It was the beginning of an association that would change her life in more ways than one

There are two photographs that hang on my office wall. Every day when I enter my office I look at them before starting my day. They are pictures of two old people, one of a gentleman in a blue suit and the other a black-and-white image of a man with dreamy eyes and a white beard.

People have asked me if the people in the photographs are related to me. Some have even asked me, “Is this black-and-white photo that of a Sufi saint or a religious guru?” I smile and reply “No, nor are they related to me. These people made an impact on my life. I am grateful to them.” “Who are they?” “The man in the blue suit is Bharat Ratna JRD Tata and the black-and-white photo is of Jamsetji Tata.” “But why do you have them in your office?” “You can call it gratitude.”

Then, invariably, I have to tell the person the following story.

It was a long time ago. I was young and bright, bold and idealistic. I was in the final year of my master’s course in computer science at the Indian Institute of Science [IISc] in Bangalore, then known as the Tata Institute. Life was full of fun and joy. I did not know what helplessness or injustice meant.

It was probably the April of 1974. Bangalore was getting warm and red gulmohars were blooming at the IISc campus. I was the only girl in my postgraduate department and was staying at the ladies hostel. Other girls were pursuing research in different departments of science. I was looking forward to going abroad to complete a doctorate in computer science. I had been offered scholarships from universities in US. I had not thought of taking up a job in India.

One day, while on the way to my hostel from our lecture-hall complex, I saw an advertisement on the notice board. It was a standard job-requirement notice from the famous automobile company Telco [now Tata Motors]. It stated that the company required young, bright engineers, hardworking and with an excellent academic background, etc.

At the bottom was a small line: “Lady candidates need not apply.” I read it and was very upset. For the first time in my life I was up against gender discrimination.

Though I was not keen on taking up a job, I saw this as a challenge. I had done extremely well in academics, better than most of my male peers. Little did I know then that in real life academic excellence is not enough to be successful.

Images Sudha Murthy – Then and Now!

Returning to my  room. I decided to inform the topmost person in Telco’s management about the injustice the company was perpetrating. I got a postcard and started to write, but there was a problem: I did not know who headed Telco. I thought it must be one of the Tatas. I knew JRD Tata was the head of the Tata Group; I had seen his pictures in newspapers (actually, Sumant Moolgaokar was the company’s chairman then).

I took the card, addressed it to JRD and started writing. To this day I remember clearly what I wrote. “The great Tatas have always been pioneers. They are the people who started the basic infrastructure industries in India, such as iron and steel, chemicals, textiles and locomotives. They have cared for higher education in India since 1900 and they were responsible for the establishment of the Indian Institute of Science. Fortunately, I study there. But I am surprised how a company such as Telco is discriminating on the basis of gender.”

I posted the letter and forgot about it. Less than 10 days later, I received a telegram stating that I had to appear for an interview at Telco’s Pune facility at the company’s expense.

I was taken aback by the telegram. My hostel mates told me I should use the opportunity to go to Pune free of cost — and buy them the famous Pune saris for cheap! I collected Rs 30 each from everyone who wanted a sari. When I look back, I feel like laughing at the reasons for my going, but back then they seemed good enough to make the trip.

It was my first visit to Pune and I immediately fell in love with the city. To this day it remains dear to me. I feel as much at home in Pune as I do in Hubli, my hometown. The place changed my life in so many ways.

As directed, I went to Telco’s Pimpri office for the interview. There were six people on the panel and I realised then that this was serious business. “This is the girl who wrote to JRD,” I heard somebody whisper as soon as I entered the room. By then I knew for sure that I would not get the job. That realisation abolished all fears from my mind, so I was rather cool while the interview was being conducted.

Even before the interview started, I reckoned the panel was biased, so I told them, rather impolitely, “I hope this is only a technical interview.” They were taken aback by my rudeness, and even today I am ashamed about my attitude.

The panel asked me technical questions and I answered all of them. Then an elderly gentleman with an affectionate voice told me, “Do you know why we said lady candidates need not apply? The reason is that we have never employed any ladies on the shop floor. This is not a co-ed college; this is a factory. When it comes to academics, you are a first ranker throughout. We appreciate that, but people like you should work in research laboratories.”

I was a young girl from small-town Hubli. My world had been a limited place. I did not know the ways of large corporate houses and their difficulties, so I answered, “But you must start somewhere, otherwise no woman will ever be able to work in your factories.”

Finally, after a long interview, I was told I had been successful. So this was what the future had in store for me. Never had I thought I would take up a job in Pune. That city changed my life in many ways. I met a shy young man from Karnataka there, we became good friends and we got married.

It was only after joining Telco that I realised who JRD was: the uncrowned king of Indian industry. Now I was scared, but I did not get to meet him till I was transferred to Bombay. One day I had to show some reports to Mr Moolgaokar, our chairman, who we all knew as SM. I was in his office on the first floor of Bombay House [the Tata headquarters] when, suddenly, JRD walked in. That was the first time I saw ‘appro JRD’. Appro means ‘our’ in Gujarati. That was the affectionate term by which people at Bombay House called him.

I was feeling very nervous, remembering my postcard episode. SM introduced me nicely, “Jeh (that’s what his close associates called him), this young woman is an engineer and that too a postgraduate. She is the first woman to work on the Telco shop floor.” JRD looked at me. I was praying he would not ask me any questions about my interview (or the postcard that preceded it). Thankfully, he didn’t. Instead he remarked. “It is nice that girls are getting into engineering in our country. By the way, what is your name?” “When I joined Telco I was Sudha Kulkarni, Sir,” I replied. “Now I am Sudha Murty.” He smiled that kindly smile and started a discussion with SM. As for me, I almost ran out of the room.

After that I used to see JRD on and off. He was the Tata Group chairman and I was merely an engineer. There was nothing that we had in common. I was in awe of him.

One day I was waiting for Murthy, my husband, to pick me up after office hours. To my surprise I saw JRD standing next to me. I did not know how to react. Yet again I started worrying about that postcard. Looking back, I realise JRD had forgotten about it. It must have been a small incident for him, but not so for me.

“Young lady, why are you here?” he asked. “Office time is over.” I said, “Sir, I’m waiting for my husband to come and pick me up.” JRD said, “It is getting dark and there’s no one in the corridor. I’ll wait with you till your husband comes.” I was quite used to waiting for Murthy, but having JRD waiting alongside made me extremely uncomfortable.

I was nervous. Out of the corner of my eye I looked at him. He wore a simple white pant and shirt. He was old, yet his face was glowing. There wasn’t any air of superiority about him. I was thinking, “Look at this person. He is a chairman, a well-respected man in our country and he is waiting for the sake of an ordinary employee.”

Then I saw Murthy and I rushed out. JRD called and said, “Young lady, tell your husband never to make his wife wait again.”

In 1982 I had to resign from my job at Telco. I was reluctant to go, but I really did not have a choice. I was coming down the steps of Bombay House after wrapping up my final settlement when I saw JRD coming up. He was absorbed in thought. I wanted to say goodbye to him so I stopped. He saw me and paused.

Gently, he said, “So what are you doing, Mrs Kulkarni? (That was the way he always addressed me.) “Sir, I am leaving Telco.” “Where are you going?” he asked. “Pune, sir. My husband is starting a company called Infosys and I’m shifting to Pune.” “Oh! And what you will do when you are successful?” “Sir, I don’t know whether we will be successful.” “Never start with diffidence,” he advised me. “Always start with confidence. When you are successful you must give back to society. Society gives us so much; we must reciprocate. I wish you all the best.”

Then JRD continued walking up the stairs. I stood there for what seemed like a millennium. That was the last time I saw him alive.

Many years later I met Ratan Tata in the same Bombay office, occupying the chair JRD once did. I told him of my many sweet memories of working with Telco. Later, he wrote to me, “It was nice listening about Jeh from you. The sad part is that he’s not alive to see you today.”

I consider JRD a great man because, despite being an extremely busy person, he valued one postcard written by a young girl seeking justice. He must have received thousands of letters every day. He could have thrown mine away, but he didn’t do that. He respected the intentions of that unknown girl, who had neither influence nor money, and gave her an opportunity in his company. He did not merely give her a job; he changed her life and mindset forever.

Close to 50 per cent of the students in today’s engineering colleges are girls. And there are women on the shop floor in many industry segments. I see these changes and I think of JRD. If at all time stops and asks me what I want from life, I would say I wish JRD were alive today to see how the company we started has grown. He would have enjoyed it wholeheartedly.

My love and respect for the House of Tatas remains undiminished by the passage of time. I always looked up to JRD. I saw him as a role model – for his simplicity, his generosity, his kindness and the care he took of his employees. Those blue eyes always reminded me of the sky; they had the same vastness and munificence.

* Sudha Murthy is the chairperson of the Infosys Foundation. She is involved in a number of social development initiatives and is also a widely published writer.

May some of our big Influential Rich Powerful in Oman read this – and we all learn from this!

Best Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

All About My New Books – Three! Reply

My New Books Under Publication – Three!

Please visit www.myown-ebooks.com and www.bethesafedriver.com

Three New Books.

1 Behind The Whel! – Road Safety Novel Book. – www.bethesafedriver.com

2 Between Us Only! – The Sequel – Book 3.

3 Between Us Only! – Short Takes! – The Sequel – Two!

Previous Books – www.myown-ebooks.com

1 Between Us Only!

2 The Sequel – Between Us Only!

3 Short Takes – Between Us Only!

4 Psychology of Arab Management Thinking! – Book One – Arab Management.

5 A Cry For Help! – Context and Perspectives – Arabian Management Series!

(Book Two in Arab Management)

Images in www.myown-ebooks.com

Best Wishes and Regards,

Majid Al Suleimany

Muscat – Sultanate of Oman.

September 30th, 2012

All My Books Icons & Press Release Reply

All My Books Icons

The Books:-

1 – Between Us Only!

2 – The Sequel – Between Us Only!

3 – Short Takes – Between Us Only!

4 – Psychology of Arab Management Thinking!

5 – A Cry For Help!

6 – Behind The Wheel!

7 – Between Us Only! – Three – The Sequel!

8 – Between Us Only! – Short Takes 2 – The Sequel!

6 to 8 are new under Final Publication.

Publisher Trafford – Press Release – August 29th 2012

**FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE**

EDITORS: For review copies or interview requests, contact:

Marketing Services

Tel: 1-888-232-4444

Fax: 812-961-3133

Email: promotions(at)trafford(dot)com

(When requesting a review copy, please provide a street address.)  

Majid Al Suleimany’s exciting new book is “A Cry for Help!”

“A Cry for Help!” examines the management styles of Arabian Gulf Corporation Council countries

MUSCAT, Oman – Author Majid Al Suleimany exposes the increasing extremism, fundamentalism and radicalization in management styles and employees’ receptions and reaction in his new book “A Cry for Help!”(published by Trafford Publishing

With over 35 years of human resource experience in Oman and with the Gulf Cooperation Council countries, Al Suleimany digs deep into the Arab office environment. Suleimany spins “a frank, honest and open book exposing the increasing lack of ethics, principles, professionalism and tolerance in the office environment.”  

“A Cry for Help!” focuses on the particular type of management that is being used in the Arab workplace while explaining the context and perspectives in the work environment. He goes on to explain what is peculiar, special, or particular to that work in the context of, and in comparison to, management styles of other nations. 

About the Author 

Majid Al Suleimany resides in Oman with his wife and four children. He has published four other books: “Psychology of Arab management!,” “The Sequel – Between Us Only!,” “Short Takes – Between Us Only!” and “Between Us Only! Book One.” He has two others in production: “Between Us Only! The Sequel Three” and “Behind the Wheel!” Al Suleimany is also a columnist for The Oman Daily Observer. He has worked in management, human resources and as a consultant for over 35 years in Oman. 

Trafford Publishing, an Author Solutions, Inc. author services imprint, was the first publisher in the world to offer an “on-demand publishing service,” and has led the independent publishing revolution since its establishment in 1995. Trafford was also one of the earliest publishers to utilize the Internet for selling books. More than 10,000 authors from over 120 countries have utilized Trafford’s experience for self publishing their books. For more information about Trafford Publishing, or to publish your book today, call 1-888-232-4444 or visit trafford.com.